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Thread: How does this tool for installing rivet nuts work?

  1. #1

    Default How does this tool for installing rivet nuts work?

    This tool



    is used to install these rivet nuts



    See page 3215 of McMaster-Carr for more info.

    What's the inside of the tool look like? I'm guessing it's just threaded parts, but want more info before I think about making one.

    I'm assuming you screw the mandrel into the rivet nut, put it in the hole, hole the small (upper) part of the tool stationary with one wrench, and turn the larger part to put tension on the mandrel.

    Roger
    Last edited by winchman; 12-02-2008 at 03:57 AM.

  2. #2
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    From what I understand from my local industrial fastener place, you can set them with nothing more than a bolt and stack of washers. I went a different direction with my project, so I never tried it, but my guess is the fancy tool there just provides a bearing surface so that you can easily set them w/o galling the work. Looks like you thread the bolt into the nut, and then tighten the jack nut agains the large piece of hex stock. Allows you to hold the bolt w/ a allen wrench to keep the insert from spinning, and tighten the nut to pull it in and set it.

    Good luck,
    Jason

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
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    Yep that about how it works, one came with the bed ladder racks I had in the PU. After yo drill the hole and place the rivet it just compresses the skirt on the rivet. Just like the smaller hand riveter looks like a pop rivet squeeze gun. Don't know if I can find the one from the pick up rack but will take a picture of the other setup/kit I have.
    Glen
    Been there, probably broke it, doing that!
    I am not a lawyer, and never played one on TV!
    All the usual and standard disclaimers apply. Do not try this at home, use only as directed, No warranties express or implied, for the intended use or the suggested uses, Wear safety glasses, closed course, professionals only

  4. #4
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    No Winchman, you got to spend lots of Dollars on the tool that has handles and various different mandrel threads.
    Seriously though, DON'T try to do it with just a stack of washers, cos chances are that you may pull the thread out of the insert (especially the alumininininium ones).
    Jason described the best method,- Allen capscrew with a nut screwed on, solid sleeve with screw clearance hole through it, possibly a washer between nut and sleeve and a dab of grease.
    Screw the screw to full depth of insert plus 2 turns and holding screw with Allen key,tighten nut to "Jack" the insert tight and Robert is your Fathers brother.
    How much does a cap screw and a nut cost? Sleeve can also be made from round bar for the GT version.

    Regards Ian.

  5. #5
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    Can't find the one that came with the rack but here's is the hand squeezer one




    I got it at lee valley a number of years ago, they do work in wood and wood sheet if you squeeze slowly as not to split the wood.
    Glen
    Been there, probably broke it, doing that!
    I am not a lawyer, and never played one on TV!
    All the usual and standard disclaimers apply. Do not try this at home, use only as directed, No warranties express or implied, for the intended use or the suggested uses, Wear safety glasses, closed course, professionals only

  6. #6
    Join Date
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    Rivnuts are great, and I use them all the time in my various products. Problem is they are Slooooowwwwww to install when you are doing it for money. Get the rivet gun style, which, while still slow, will be a lot faster than the screw type, and you have better feel. Rivnuts do not need to be set white knuckle tight, matter of fact, you can break your setting equipment, ask me how I know!

    I dream of getting one of the neat air powered spin-pull-spin guns that spin on the insert, pull it like a rivet gun to set it, and then spin it off. Total time about two seconds. Thats about 30 seconds faster than I can manage and when you are installing 8 or 10 rivnuts per panel, that adds up to real time. These little jewels run about $1500.
    James Kilroy

  7. #7
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    When you need them they're great, nice professional looking job also, I've used them on the seatpan on motorcycles where even tig would have started to melt foam, the installed nut is fairly low profile especially in the smaller sizes. I used it last week to mount a car rad into a fan unit I scrounged from the dumpster, limited access and the air would have been blue for an hour if I'd of tried to get a loose nut on the bolts, viola free shop heater.

  8. #8
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    Default How does this tool work???

    The tool looks like an allen bolt, a nut and a spacer. You thread the nut onto the bolt all the way, stick the bolt/nut combo throught he spacer and thread teh nutsert onto the bolt. Stick the nutsert through the hole in the material and teh keep teh bolt from turning while you spin the nut down compressing the nutsert. Whenthe nutsert is tight loosen the nut and spin teh bolt out of the nutsert. Repeat for more nutserts.

  9. #9
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    I came by most of my nutserts as floor sweepings from a local plant some 35 years ago. I did have to buy the tool and at that time they were a Good Year item. My tool is a little different than what everyone is describing in that it has a bearing that the insertion torque is applied against, making it quite easy to pull the nutsert into submission.
    THANX RICH

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