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Thread: Machine lights

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Location
    Nottingham, England
    Posts
    16,177

    Default Machine lights

    Not wanting to hijack Sids post on the quill light I though I'd start a new one

    I am really interested in this subject as the two old fashioned machine lights on the Bridgy are crap.
    They are impossible to get into the right position and if you can, the arms get in the way.

    I have looked at what various people have done but I'm not sure that these LED's will put as much light out as the old 24v incandescents.
    24 volt Halogens are reasonably rare here as regards mainstream applications so expensive and the transformer on this and the other two lathes are 50 / 25 volt, not 24 / 12 so the cheap low voltage kitchen and household lights are out.

    I got a 6 led torch and tried it on the machine at night and to be honest it was a waste of time although I believe you can now get really bright white LED's.

    I can't use a quill mounted unit for a few reasons, because I often get in tight spaces where the quill catching on the work is a limitation and I have a horizontal and high speed attachment that bolts to the quill.

    Something I have not seen at all, is in Sid's No #2 post, both lower pictures, has anyone else noticed the dead space between the back of the quill and the end of the sliding ram ?

    All there is there on my machine is a dovetail bracket [ original ? ] that holds the coolant pipe.
    I had thought about a couple of small lights fitted to this, one either side on adjustable rods like a dial gauge stand [ or even two magnetic stands to try it ] with the light on the end.

    Comments, flames, flying bricks etc.

    Question probably for Evan as he has more experience on the subject than I have [ thinking about it even our dog has ]

    I can get 6 high powered LED's that run off 24v in series with it's resistor. I was thinking about making a small spot light like the halogen ones out of a lump of alloy.
    Machine a reflector, drill 6 holes in it perpendicular to the face and put a plain, flat, Lexan cover / lens over it.

    Looking 2" diameter or a tad above, what shape does the reflector need to be ? can do this on the small CNC lathe.

    .
    .

    Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.




  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Scotland.
    Posts
    652

    Default

    John,save up your pennies and get a Waldmann catalogue.The cat is free but the lights are top prices.Last for ever though and coolant etc doesn`t bother them.Avoid Chronos halogen lights at all costs.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Location
    Nottingham, England
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    16,177

    Default

    Mark,
    All the halogen's I have seen are 12 volt, OK some have inbuilt transformers but that means running cables to machines.
    I'm looking at head replacements so I can use existing holder / wiring etc with the exception of the Bridgy which needs new holders.

    I'm probably looking at 9 or 10 new heads which gets expensive.

    .
    .

    Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.




  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Huntsville Ala
    Posts
    5,870

    Default

    I bought a little flex neck LED light from HF recently. It has both a magnet and clip-on base - real handy as far as that goes. But... although it's extremely bright to look at, that LED light just doesn't seem to provide much useful illumination of the target.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    UK
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    1,572

    Default

    Not directly addressing your question, but I've wondered about an LED head torch, make up a bracket for it which should be dead easy (some of them are dual purpose head/cycle lamps)
    I have one with 30 LEDs, gives a pretty useful light though haven't tried it on a machine.
    Obvious limitations are -
    -Not immensely durable or completely coolant proof - though they are made for outdoor use.
    -Dependent on batteries, not great for use during the full working week but should be fine for occasional work
    -They often have those irritating multi-mode push buttons, which you have to cycle through to get the one you want.
    I must admit I haven't followed the other thread right through, so may be touching on something which has already been covered.

    I got a 1W single LED torch the other day, no use directly for machine work but very impressive in terms of light output for physical size and alleged battery life. Runs off three AAA cells, I'd expect that half a dozen of those LEDs off a 24V supply would do a fairly impressive job.

    Tim

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Central Queensland, Australia
    Posts
    2,201

    Default

    My mill had a 24V light on it and I just replaced it with a 12V Halogen spot light and wired the tranformer into the switchgear box.. I think it is 50W with a 30 degree spread..Holder, bulb and transformer was AU$15. (So I got two )

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Kenosha, not the pass the other one
    Posts
    2,784

    Default

    Part of the solution is if you think you have enough lighting inthe shop. Think again and double it. My shop area is small with a low ceiling. The best solution I have found so far is track lighting with a lot of lamp heads. Plus I have some LED swing arm lamps I picked up at the Tiawan Hardware Store (Menard's)that I will mount right on the machines them selves.
    Forty plus years and I still have ten toes, ten fingers and both eyes. I must be doing something right.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    379

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    John,
    on a 24V machine run 12V halogens - in pairs wired in series?
    I've harvested the sockets from kitchen lighting kits from B&Q's bargain shelf.
    Regards,
    Nick

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Skaneateles, ny
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    1,164

    Default

    John- My mill is a ProtoTrak K3. It's a bit bigger that a standard Bridgeport mill. Maybe that's why the space behind the quill your seeing?
    Yes, there are some dead spots. I used one common ring of PCB. If I used separate ones, they could have been angled and aimed to fill just beond a chuck distance for instance.
    The lighting is not perfect. That's why I mounted it with magnets, so it comes off easy. I didn't get rid of my 110v task lights either.
    The whole thing cost me nothing but an hour or so of time, and was more of an experiment.

    Sid

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    UK
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    Default

    For 24V halogens, what about commercial vehicle headlamp bulbs, or would they be Over The Top?
    Actually they wouldn't run at full brightness on a true 24V supply, as vehicle voltage with engine running will be around 28 to 30V

    Tim

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