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Thread: Semi OT: Stumpy gets a transplant

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    52N 122W Western Kanuckistan
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    40,418

    Talking Semi OT: Stumpy gets a transplant

    Remember Stumpy? (OK, not everyone does)

    That's the old rototiller I converted to a stump grinder by swapping out the tines for an old Briggs flywheel with half a dozen carbide teeth silver soldered on the rim. The transmission was dead so it was removed and the main shaft is driven directly from the engine via a belt.

    The old Stumpy:



    The old Stumpy worked really well on stumps that had been allowed to decay for a while. However, I have been doing some logging to clear dying fir trees near the house and I have some sizable brand new stumps to remove. Stumpy needed to grow a pair.

    The new Stumpy:


    Since I built Stumpy I gained some sawmill quality carbide tooth gang saw blades. These don't resemble consumer type saw blades. They are far heavier and each carbide tooth is about 3/16" square by 1/2 to 3/4" long. As I have no saw capable of using these blades I took the poorest of the lot and Stumpy got a transplant.



    As luck would have it the blade is about 1 inch larger in diameter than the old Briggs flywheel. That's perfect as the flywheel serves to prevent the blade from taking too much of a bite. The bladed is mig welded to the existing flywheel retainer.

    The Blade:



    The stumps were prepped by digging out around them and pressure washing the dirt and rocks off of them, then allowed to dry.

    30 minutes later the stumps shown above are history. It cuts 10 times faster with some chips as big as your finger flying 10 feet away at times.

    Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Origin now settable to bottom left! All values positive. Click Here

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Lexington, Ohio
    Posts
    2,579

    Default

    Nice transplant, how is the vibration level while un-stumping

    That sure looks handy.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Location
    Nottingham, England
    Posts
    15,198

    Default

    Neat, what's it like engraving you name on the decking

    What about slicing one of those blades up and making parting tools out of them ?
    .
    .

    Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.




  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    516

    Default

    Heh, that's what, a 6-7 inch blade on 3 HP? Doesn't slow down much does it?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2003
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    52N 122W Western Kanuckistan
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    I have it set so that it slips pretty easily. I don't want it taking off across the yard if I lose my grip on it. It also stops it from trying to leap over the stump.

    Those blades are incredibly sharp and are designed to chop through nails and stones that might be incorporated in the lumber.

    Vibration isn't bad at all, I accidentally managed to get the blade pretty well centered.
    Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Origin now settable to bottom left! All values positive. Click Here

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    4,448

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    I was playing with some shuriken inside the house once, throwed one of them into a piece of plywood and it came off it, ran around that wall, around the side wall, around the wall behind me, off the wall and across my foot..

    I had a row of bloody dots across my foot..

    Some shuriken you got there Evan..
    Excuse me, I farted.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2003
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    I have more. The one I used on Stumpy is the one on top.

    Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Origin now settable to bottom left! All values positive. Click Here

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Nazareth, PA
    Posts
    2,399

    Default

    i'm going to have to keep my eyes open for some of those blades. my dad has an old tiller similar to yours and i do have some stumps that need grinding. what would i search for on fleabay to find some? sawmill blades?

    andy b.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2003
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    They are gang saw blades with the exception of the large one on the bottom.
    Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Origin now settable to bottom left! All values positive. Click Here

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Vermont
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    643

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    Interesting machine. I suspect that a similar job could be done with an old edger-trimmer if you don't have an old rototiller handy.

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