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Thread: How I made my Integral 10/22

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
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    Default How I made my Integral 10/22

    I know this is a home machinist form, so I thought maybe some of you would like to see how I made an integrally suppressed 10/22. I have posted this on some silencer forums, so some of you guys may have already seen it. I made it on a Grizzly G4003G.

    The unit was based on this design, a sketch I made of my John’s Guns MarkII integral pistol.


    The unit is made from a 1 inch 316 stainless DOM tube with a .065 wall thickness, and a .870 inside diameter.


    Photos
    1. Completed Unit

    2. Broached End Cap (threaded 28 tpi) Major Diameter of threaded area turned to .902 inches before threading. The part of the end cap that fits against the outer tube was bevel cut at about 4ļ instead of square, to make the end cap almost invisible. The same procedure was done to the end of the tube using the compound slide as shown in photo 13.

    3. Tube layout indicating where to cut the barrel, where the threading was going to be and how long the outer tube was going to be. And most importantly, where to install the internal snap ring. If too much barrel is sticking out past the barrel nut, then the exposed threads can collect crud and lock the nut on the end of the barrel. Shoot for flush as in photo 10.

    4. The barrel chucked up in the lathe. The chucked end of the barrel is being held in an aluminum collet I made specifically for a 10/22 barrel. The tailstock end is just mounted in a live center (I don’t care about the crown at this point.) Since the barrel was tapered, I needed cut a non tapered area so I could use my 4 jaw chuck to get zero run out of the bore for the threading of the end of the barrel. I also took this time to turn a flat area in front of the V block that would accommodate a bushing that was the same diameter as the receiver end of the barrel. This bushing will help align the tube out front of the V block, see photo 17. The bushing is not resting where it will end up, up inside the barrel a little further. I will probably tack weld the bushing to the barrel.

    5. The barrel with bushing and barrel nut installed. I added 2 more ports later. The ports were drilled 5 inches in front of the chamber so the velocity will not be less than that fired from a 5 inch pistol.

    6. These photos show how I made the barrel nut. I don’t have a mill so I used a hack saw and some files. One problem emerged. I needed a pattern for the nut. The barrel was threaded Ĺ X 20 tpi. I needed a nut that required a 5/8” socket. The only kind of nut I could find that fit a 5/8” socket was a 3/8-16 coupling. The coupling was cut, drilled and threaded for Ĺ X 20. Please note that the barrel nut needs a shoulder for the spacer to sit on. (and the socket fit over the nut). The spacer is placed in front of the barrel nut to create an expansion chamber, and the spacer fits nicely over the created nut. Make sure the spacer has holes drilled in it so you can get a hook on it to remove it.

    7. After some practice (photo 8, 9, 20) I cut the groove for the snap ring about 9 inches deep using a ĺ” boring bar. I made sure the groove was just inside where the lathe chuck held the tube. I am pointing at where the groove is going.

    8. Shows the practice groove and snap ring.

    9. Removal of the snap ring using homemade removal tool I designed for this job.

    10. Barrel nut on the end of the barrel.

    11. Snap ring removal tool with a 24 inch reach.

    12. Snap ring removal tool, business end.


    13. End cap end of the outer tube is beveled to guarantee a good tight fit.

    14. Threading for the end cap.

    15. Internals displayed.

    16. Cutout for the V block.

    17. Bushing for in front of the V block. Also note that the inside diameter of the tube (.870) is smaller than the outside diameter of the barrel (.919). So the inside diameter of the tube at the back was bored to .919 to accommodate the bushing and the back of the original barrel.

    18. Cutter used for the snap ring groove.

    19. Installed snap ring.

    20. Practice session for the snap ring groove using a SS tube I got from a salvage yard.
    Last edited by Ron of Va; 09-12-2019 at 09:40 AM.

  2. #2
    dewat Guest

    Thumbs up

    Nice looking work, good job !!!!!!! One of these days I have to get around to it, but for now I went for quick and dirty ( 20 years ago), I have a can for my .45 cal Ingram and I bought an adapter to screw it on an M 16 , which I never did, but I had a buddy thread my 10-22 barrel, even though its a .45 cal. can its still real quite ( hammer fall) especially with sub-sonic ammo. Down side : its heavy and big have to use a scope, iron sights not tall enough.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Nazareth, PA
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    2,399

    Thumbs up

    Excellent work!!!
    so the snap ring just holds the baffle stack in place? i notice the baffles have some holes in them. are they held in a certain position (no need to give out a secret if it is something you devised)? does the suppressor bottom out on the receiver or the barrel ring you made?

    have you had a chance to fire it yet?

    andy b.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
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    Tidewater, Va
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    Default

    Thanks guys, for the compliments.
    Andy:
    The barrel nut slides down inside the outer tube and screws onto the end of the barrel. It presses against the snap ring holding the outer tube against the gun receiver.

    After the barrel nut (called a threaded plug in the drawing) is installed, a spacer, which is just a hollow tube, fits against the top of the barrel nut. The baffles are then installed in front of the spacer. There is no particular orientation of the baffles.

    This unit is very quiet. I also own a Johns Gunís integral 10/22. It has 6 baffles in comparison, and is almost as quiet as this one I made. It is just as quiet as anything commercially available.

    I also own a CZ 452 integral which stomps the ass of both of the 10/22ís. The CZ is not much louder than a finger snap, and that is what I was trying to achieve with the 10/22 build. Unfortunately the 10/22 is not as quiet as the CZ.

  5. #5
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    Default

    My question is, how do you de-burr the inside of the barrel when ported, and how do you keep the ports from collecting lead over time?

    I'm not criticizing at all, just curious. 22's are notorious for leading.

    I have just the thing to do the same thing on.....

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
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    Tidewater, Va
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rws
    My question is, how do you de-burr the inside of the barrel when ported, and how do you keep the ports from collecting lead over time?

    I'm not criticizing at all, just curious. 22's are notorious for leading.

    I have just the thing to do the same thing on.....
    The ports were de-burred with a 1/8" Cogsdill Burraway Deburring tool.
    http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INPDFF?PMPAGE=240&PMCTLG=00

    Also the hole is drilled slightly smaller before going to the final bit size. A couple thousandths of an inch. This minimizes the burrs. Also a through and through hole is easy to deburr, even without the Cogsdill tool.

  7. #7
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    Default

    The bushing shown in pics 15 and 17, this prevents gasses from by passing the barrel and venting into the forend?
    Ignorance is curable through education.

  8. #8
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    Apr 2009
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    Tidewater, Va
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Rusty Marlin
    The bushing shown in pics 15 and 17, this prevents gasses from by passing the barrel and venting into the forend?
    Yes it also prevents gases from flowing back towards the receiver.

    But more importantly, this is the area where the taper of the barrel starts. It would become a sloppy fit if it were not for the bushing to help align the tube to the muzzle. This alignment is critical to preventing baffle strikes. If it were not for the cutout for the V block the bushing probably would not be needed.

    Although the cutout for the V block looks excessive, the bolts through the V block are long, and stay very close to the barrel. And if not for the long cutout, the bolts would be jammed up at tube.

  9. #9
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    Feb 2010
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    Raleigh, NC
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    5. The barrel with bushing and barrel nut installed. I added 2 more ports later. The ports were drilled 5 inches in front of the chamber so the velocity will not be less than that fired from a 5 inch pistol.

    I'm curious on one point for number 5. Why did you port the gun at 5 inches rather than further down the barrel (i.e. 5 inches from the muzzle)? Was it because you were not going to fire subsonic ammunition and need to to bring the muzzle velocity down? If you were shooting subsonic 22 ammo, then I'd think you wouldn't want to loose muzzle velocity by porting "early." I guess my real question is, did shooting 22 shorts with a 5 inch port equate to subsonic rounds or did you use subsonic ammo?

    Very cool post and work, btw. Thanks for sharing.

    Dan

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by MrDan
    5. The barrel with bushing and barrel nut installed. I added 2 more ports later. The ports were drilled 5 inches in front of the chamber so the velocity will not be less than that fired from a 5 inch pistol.

    I'm curious on one point for number 5. Why did you port the gun at 5 inches rather than further down the barrel (i.e. 5 inches from the muzzle)? Was it because you were not going to fire subsonic ammunition and need to to bring the muzzle velocity down? If you were shooting subsonic 22 ammo, then I'd think you wouldn't want to loose muzzle velocity by porting "early." I guess my real question is, did shooting 22 shorts with a 5 inch port equate to subsonic rounds or did you use subsonic ammo?

    Very cool post and work, btw. Thanks for sharing.

    Dan
    I am glad you liked the build.

    The closer to the chamber you drill the ports, the lower the velocity. I didnít want the velocity to less than that fired from a 5 inch pistol.

    Since bulk 22lr ammo is mostly high velocity, and much cheaper than other kinds, I wanted to reduce high velocity ammo to subsonic velocity.

    There is also a relationship between the suppression and the porting. The more aggressive you port the barrel, the quieter the gun will sound. I added two more ports in front of the ones you see in the photo, because the ones you see did not give me adequate sound suppression.

    This additional porting added significant sound suppression without affecting velocity. The down side of aggressive porting is you have to make sure there are no burrs left in the bore. So it is more labor intensive to continue the porting, and the more ports you drill, the more likely you will be to get it wrong. Also, there is an area of diminishing returns with respect to sound suppression.

    I have three other integrals that were commercially made. They are ported about 2 inches from the chamber. I found that I lost more velocity than I wanted to, with that configuration. So I chose 5 inches as a compromise.

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