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Thread: Welding cloths....a caution!

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by David E Cofer
    Yeah... the wide band emf does us all no-good either.
    The Ultra Violet light from Tig can be exceptionaly damaging

    Problem is it goes right through the thin layers of skin on the backs of your hands and does some Very Serious Damage on the Tendons. Same goes for the inside of your elbows where those of us who prefer not to wear sleeves get those nice little Tig Sunburns

    As for tough

    I was welding with 6011 when a nice size cheery fell into my untied tennis shoe - but I finished the bead hopping on 1 foot

  2. #12
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    Fire retardant clothing comes in various types.

    Proban and the like are treated cotton. As such they DO lose their fire inhibition properties with laundering.

    Nomex, and the Dale aramids are inherently fire retardant as the chemistry of the manmade fibre is flame retardant. As such they do not lose their fire retardant properties when laundered properly.

    Proban, Nomex, and the Dale aramid fabrics are only good for flash fire protection and are not sufficient protection for welding where the burns can be from hot globs of stuff, but they will not sustain an open flame and they do not melt into your skin like synthetic threads will.

    My $.02 cdn.
    Cam

    P.S. watch the potential for infection Russ, as I'm sure you're aware, it can make a bad burn waaayyyy worse.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by torker
    I just got the latest burns all cleaned up and dressed for the day...lol! These are nasty lil buggers tho...because I wasn't paying attention.
    I now have 4 lovely lil 1st degree burns that will take a long time to heal.
    Look at your stuff....if it has poly in it...don't weld in it....you could get bit!
    Russ
    I use our Aloe Vera plant for any burns that I receive, welding, sun, whatever.Also for cuts.
    With my last serious deep tissue burn my old dog 'Tan' kept it clean till it healed when medication wouldn't work a bean.
    Good luck with the repair Russ.
    Ken.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by speedy
    I use our Aloe Vera plant for any burns that I receive, welding, sun, whatever.Also for cuts.
    With my last serious deep tissue burn my old dog 'Tan' kept it clean till it healed when medication wouldn't work a bean.
    Good luck with the repair Russ.
    A second to that, it does work!

  5. #15
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    Bag balm, cow udder creme.. Vitamin E diaper lotion with medication.. works great on burns.. I should know.

    It also works good on tattoos, a sub topical needle abrasion like. (many many holes closely spaced together)

    I got a tube just the other day, the green can with flowers is what I used to see up north.. THE women use it as a moisturizer in the dry western air.. or they look like a iguana when they get my age.. THE women who looked my age were almost a illegal age.. (run away old man) too expensive to keep.
    Excuse me, I farted.

  6. #16
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    I still just cope with leathers, they keep the pain factor down. We used to wear these heavy cotton (denim) type coveralls. they worked great until they frayed, then we were putting out hot spots. They mostly smoldered, but on occasion we got flames. All in all they worked really well. Been some years since I did any production welding (long hours) but much of the time I went the t-shirt route Always noticed the slight burn on my arms, but it never really bothered me. I have to agree, I notice more burns now from chips then I ever did welding.

  7. #17
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    Hi all,

    Yep first time poster. Yeah I go along with the Vitamin E cream and aloe vera (raid the missus stash). She dont mind cause shes always complaining about how rough my hands are.

    Went out and picked up a leather hood and jacket. Do a bit of overhead welding, so I recon this gear is a must. Get some funny looks and comments when customers pop in, but after I show em the burn mark in my helment (how it didnt wreck the LCD lens I dont know) they soon understsnd why I wear a hood.

    Recently got given a jacket by a bloke who does pours in a foundary. Its got the leather sleeves, but a different type of material for the rest of it. No tags to suggest what its made from. Havent tried it out yet.
    From an early age my father taught me to wear welding gloves . "Its not to protect your hands son, its to put out the fire when u set yourself alight".

  8. #18
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    Most of the welders where I work wear tank tops and shorts and ansi steel toe shoes. They use the green jackets and shoe string guards and other PPE as needed. But they are on production lines welding scooter frames and fuel tanks. I am in Maintenance here and have to wear Carhartt FR clothing for the variety and out of position welding that I do. Other than my pants keep shrinking(?) I have never had any issues, but I do wear the light green jacket to protect my FR shirt. It will still get holes in it. I have noticed though that my Carhartt boot soles will burn rather well if I step on a hot spent electrode stub. The little red shop towels are another issue. We have folks that like to get them smoldering then throw them up on top of a machine out of reach so all can enjoy the unique flavorful aroma.

  9. #19
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    Back in the day when I worked as an auto mechanic I used to do a LOT of exhaust work. One day I had a Malibu up on the rack installing dual pipes. I was mindlessly welding the tail pipes to the mufflers when a goober fell from the pipe into my coverall pocket. We mechanics all carried a spiral notebook in our left chest pocket to write mileage and part numbers on. That hot goober fell right into the pages of that notebook. Lit it right up. I didn't know I was on fire. The mechanic from the next bay over came running up while I was welding.. He started slapping the crap outta my chest trying to put the fire out. I stopped welding and flipped up my helmet in surprise...he was still slapping at my coveralls. He got the fire out. My coveralls were polyester. It burned the notebook, melted my ball point pen and my coveralls into a gooey melted plastic mess. Fortunately it was winter time and I had on long johns and a flannel shirt under the coveralls. I didn't get hurt...but was alarming. Needless to say... that notebook stayed in my back pocket from that point on. The firefighter mechanic found a nice bottle of Jack Daniels on his tool box the next day....


    Cheers
    Mac.

  10. #20
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    I have a couple of these

    http://cgi.ebay.com/REVCO-INDUSTRIES...d=p3286.c0.m14

    at $14.99 it is a "Hell of a Deal"

    Quote Originally Posted by jatt
    Went out and picked up a leather hood and jacket. Do a bit of overhead welding, so I recon this gear is a must. Get some funny looks and comments when customers pop in, but after I show em the burn mark in my helment (how it didnt wreck the LCD lens I dont know) they soon understsnd why I wear a hood.
    Yep I use a Leather Hood as well - it only takes 1 or 2 cheeries down the neck of your shirt to understand why
    Last edited by JoeFin; 08-09-2009 at 12:44 PM.

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