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Thread: Speaking of flintlock pistols...

  1. #1
    tony ennis Guest

    Default Speaking of flintlock pistols...

    My son wants to buy a flintlock pistol kit. Anything to be aware of? Any bad brands?

    Here's looking at this one.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Montezuma, IA
    Posts
    946

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    Dixie Gun Works has some nice items, but I would stay away from their kits. Instead, take a look at these from Track of the Wolf: http://tinyurl.com/mxxuzj. Much better quality, options available, and good folks to help with advice if needed. Also, this book will help, even though it's about flintlock rifles. http://tinyurl.com/n644wk.

    David Kaiser
    Montezuma, IA

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Toledo, Ohio
    Posts
    9,097

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    Dixie and Pedersoli are both good to deal with. The kit will probably require minor fitting, with most of the effort being in finishing the wood and polishing the metal pieces.
    Jim H.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Ashland City, TN
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    2,295

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    Buy the book first. DGW has always had good products and customer support. Good luck!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Toledo, Ohio
    Posts
    9,097

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 38_Cal
    Dixie Gun Works has some nice items, but I would stay away from their kits. Instead, take a look at these from Track of the Wolf: http://tinyurl.com/mxxuzj. Much better quality, options available, and good folks to help with advice if needed. Also, this book will help, even though it's about flintlock rifles. http://tinyurl.com/n644wk.

    David Kaiser
    Montezuma, IA
    I agree that TOW is probably a better source for true kits, I believe their prices are significantly better as well. The kit in question is a Pedersoli parts kit, that is a basically an assemble and finish kit.
    Jim H.

  6. #6
    tony ennis Guest

    Default

    ...that is a basically an assemble and finish kit.
    That's what he's looking for. We're not ready for much more.

  7. #7
    tony ennis Guest

    Default

    The kit arrived yesterday. The stock is walnut and is a little rougher than I had hoped. We'll see how well it sands out. The brass "thimbles" will need some file work to remove the casting flash though they said as much. I was surprised how long the barrel is. It'll take a man to hold it on target for very long. I can't tell if the barrel is rifled or not, lol. Since there's a breech plug so I can't really look into the barrel. When I shined (shone?) a laser in there and I thought I could see some rifling.

    There's a 'Rosetta Stone' manual of general safety, use, and assembly instructions and a photocopied diagram of parts for this specific model of pistol.

    The kit also came with a pamphlet of serious primitive rifle pr0n. It made for excellent dinner reading material.

    (I find it amusing to use a laser to do diagnostics on a flintlock...)

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    506

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    If it has rifling, you should be able to see the ends of the lands at the bore end. However, assuming you can't see them, shining your laser into the nipple hole at the breach end should give you enough light inside the bore to see the lands by looking down the bore muzzle. If you were shining the laser into the muzzle end, the glare might be too high to detect them..........

    Shooters have been doing the same basic thing for years with semi-auto rifles, except we just lock open the ejection port and stick our thumb into the breach area and let the light reflect off of our thumbnail. Works like a charm............Will work even better with a small scrap of white paper..............JMHO
    RPease

  9. #9
    tony ennis Guest

    Default

    He did a good job sanding today, the stock is looking nice.

    Now, the octagonal barrel has some scratches on it, looks like from the grinder. Also, some brass needs to have some minor blemished polished out. What's a good method of doing this? I have some wet-dry sandpaper, but I am not so sure this is the right tool for the job...

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Lexington, Ohio
    Posts
    2,579

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    Wet or Dry is good, you can bet they didn't have that when these type guns were first made, probably used Pumice and water to polish.

    Depending on the severity of the blemishes start with 180/220/320/400 maybe up to 600 for a real polish then use and chemical paste polish like Mothers or Flitz for the final polish.

    Ken

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