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Thread: 1895 Nagant conversion

  1. #1
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    Default 1895 Nagant conversion

    Fitting a .32acp cylinder to this revolver and need to cut the locking notches on the outer circumference for the loading gate. (They are just a bit short.) What is the best way to go about cutting these to get the correct angles with an end mill?

  2. #2
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    Got a drawing? Yeah I know, stupid question.
    How about a pic of the originals?
    Ignorance is curable through education.

  3. #3
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    No drawings (of course) but pics I can do....

    The original fluted 7.62x38R cylinder, and the new un-fluted .32 acp cylinder.






  4. #4
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    I'd hold it in a four jaw chuck in my universal dividing head by the body with whe the ratched end exposed; centering the cyclinder on the OD vs the ID of the base pin hole.

    I think I'd start with the original and get the angle right using an indicator and then reset with the new one. Once the angle is found, time the new cyclinder off the outer cylinder latch cuts if possable.

    The new cyclinder is quite different ins't it? The ratchet is a different shape as are the face cuts (deeper in the new one). Does the new one function properly?
    Ignorance is curable through education.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rusty Marlin
    The new cyclinder is quite different ins't it? The ratchet is a different shape as are the face cuts (deeper in the new one). Does the new one function properly?
    Yes it is, quite different indeed. Korean mfg vs. Russian.
    As received, (pic below) the new cylinder did not function at all due to the ratchet geometry. They are the same height however. After a lot of hand filing and stoning it now advances beautifully..... as long as the loading gate is left open. If closed, the spring tension of the loading gate (lug) bearing on the far side of the cylinder notches causes the cylinder to over-rotate and pull it out of time when it finally locks up.

    I actually just found a .dwg of the original cylinder but don't have a clue as to how I could post it here. I know less than nothing about using Acad.

    Last edited by Highpower; 08-18-2009 at 12:34 AM.

  6. #6
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    Default Highpower I thought these were plug and play

    I planned on maybe picking up a couple of these from Century Arms or some other dealer for my 1895s, however I thought they were plug and play. Does this mean you have to finish machining the cylinders to make them work? The .32 longs work well in my 1895s but every now and then I get a split case so I need to convert it properly before it converts me. I dont mean to jack the thread but would like alittle more info on the cylinder you are using.

  7. #7
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    You roll the dice and take your chances on these cylinders. It really depends on 1) who made the cylinder, 2) how much wear there is on your particular gun, and 3) how close the tolerances were when the gun was manufactured. That last one varies a great deal from what I understand, since these are rather crudely made weapons.

    Some people got lucky and dropped them into their gun with no problems what-so-ever. Others say only "minor" fitting was required. I've spoken with people that own multiple 1895's and say that a cylinder might work in 2 out of their 5 guns. I believe the ones that are/were "plug & play" are NOS (new, old stock) cylinders that were manufactured for or imported by several distributors years ago.

    The cylinder I have, I got recently from S.O.G. and I believe it is a more recent manufacture out of Korea. Nowhere close to being a drop in fit, so I have to make it work because it has "extra" material on it to allow for proper fitting to an individual gun.

    I would suggest you check with the usual suspects (Century, AIM, gunbroker, etc.) and avoid S.O.G. if you want to take a chance on getting an "older" cylinder that MIGHT work right out of the gate.

    Regarding the split .32 long cases - do you reload? I hear that reforming .30 carbine brass is the hot ticket these days....
    HTH.

  8. #8
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    Default No I never had a problem with any 32 longs

    Until I bought some (Aquila?) brand at the gun show, I noticed they were make in Mexico and some of them split. None of the USA brands ever did, I will be getting back into reloading soon though. I cant afford to feed my Taraus judge
    with 45 long colts and .410 shells at current prices, so I will consider the 30
    brass as a alternative to a cylinder that may or may not work for the 1895s.

  9. #9
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    I hear that. I figure one of these days the price of .32 acp will fall back to earth. In the mean time it's still cheaper than the Fiocchi Nagant ammo.

  10. #10
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    So how did you make out with this Highpower? Got that old war horse up and running yet?
    Ignorance is curable through education.

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