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Thread: Winchester 06 .22 pump

  1. #1
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    Default Winchester 06 .22 pump

    Need some help with the trigger/hammer/bolt interface on one that I've picke up years ago. The hammer wants to follow the bolt down when run fast. The primary sear surfaces look to be in good condition.

    Anybody here very familiar with these old girls?
    Ignorance is curable through education.

  2. #2
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    You sure it's not the finger/trigger interface that's causing the problem?

  3. #3
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    Try a good cleaning first. The hammer will follow the bolt when the trigger is held back as there is no disconnect on these. It might be just gummed up enough, or as Highpower suggests, the trigger needs to be released before operating the slide.
    Jim H.

  4. #4
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    Its been thouroughly dissasembled scrubbed and reassembled and lightly lubed several times.

    I grew up with these types of rifles, so I'm reasonably confident its not the loose nut behind the trigger causing the problem. LOL

    There is some form of disconnector in there, I just havn't figured it out yet. When run slow with the trigger depressed the hammer stays back like its supposed to, then just as the bolt drops into battery the hammer comes forward. (Just like a win '97 or M12).

    Its the secondary sear mechanism that has me stumped. It isn't something on the carrier like the '97 is it??? JMB designed both of them so there could be something there I'm not recognizing.
    Ignorance is curable through education.

  5. #5
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    The 1890, 06 and 62 all share the same action. There is no disconnect on the 1890, I know for sure and AFAIK, none on the later two models as parts interchange. To verify, try it with the rifle taken down, the carrier is free to float then. When in the full up position, as when feeding a cartridge, the hammer is blocked from falling when the trigger is pulled. When the carrier is lowered, the hammer will fall.

    If the hammer is dropping when the trigger is released, it is possibly sear engagement.
    Jim H.

  6. #6
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    Agreed, there is not a true disconector like in a rem 870 or an AR. But there is something that holds the hammer back till the bolt closes.

    I'll look at the carrier and its relationship to the hammer tonight. Thank you for the clues to look for.
    Ignorance is curable through education.

  7. #7
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    AH HA!
    There's a small cross pin that locks the sear under the hammer when the carrier is up. When the carrier drops (pushed down by the bolt), this cross pin drops off a ledge tripping the hammer.

    The follow problem was actually sear bounce. When closed hard, with finger off the trigger, the hammer would fall to half cock. At some point in its long life a trigger job had been attempted, based on the the stone marks on the back side of the trigger, and the sear angle changed enough that slamming the action shut would bounce the sear off, as would a good hard thump with the heel of my palm on the butt stock.

    I stoned the sear to a proper angle (hope that thing isn't case hardened or it won't last).

    I drilled the barrel tonight for its new liner and I'll have that glued in tomorrow, cut, crown and chamber Friday, and with any luck my daughter will be shooting this lovely by Saturday!
    Ignorance is curable through education.

  8. #8
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    I sold my 1906 Winchester last year for $1125. Not too bad for a rifle my great uncle bought new in 1914 for what I would guess was less then $10. There was no trigger disconnect. If you hold the trigger down while pumping the action it fires. Gary P. Hansen

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by garyphansen
    I sold my 1906 Winchester last year for $1125. Not too bad for a rifle my great uncle bought new in 1914 for what I would guess was less then $10. There was no trigger disconnect. If you hold the trigger down while pumping the action it fires. Gary P. Hansen
    Mine will never be a collectable, its purely a shooter, which for my needs and desires is just perfect.
    The barreled half was made in 1916, the trigger group was made in 1917. Some fool (not me) polished and cold blued it, which I'm not hating as the blue is wearing off nicely and bringing the finish back to a nice worn patina befitting its age.
    Ignorance is curable through education.

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