Page 2 of 6 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 59

Thread: What edition Machinery's Handbook do you have?

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Charlottesville, VA, USA
    Posts
    703

    Default

    Machinery's Handbook 26th edition (2000)
    New American Machinist's Handbook (1955, reprinted some time after 1983)
    American Machinists' Handbook 3rd edition (1920)
    All hardbound dead tree editions. I use them all.

    American Machinist's Handbook, originally published in 1908, predates machinery's handbook by about 6 years and they competed for the first half of the 20th century. Written by Colvin and Stanly, though the 1955 edition was revised by someone else (Colvin was 88years old then). He retired in 1937 but apparently worked on two more editions and his memoir, 60 years with Men and Machines. He died before completing his history of the American machine tool industry. Fred Colvin had been original chief editor of Machinery magazine and then worked on American Machinist magazine. He was author of dozens of books (some repeat editions) with Frank A Stanley a coauthor on many. The 1908 and 1914 editions are available online; unfortunately, book scanners tend not to retain the original public domain status.

    Machinery's 26th has some CNC stuff including g-code and CAT30/40/etc dimensions, newer alloys, newer cutting tools, welding symbols, etc. But still weak on R8, and lathe spindle noses. Has some structural shape sizes. The American 1955 has some lathe spindle nose data A1, A2, B1 B2, D1, L, as well as various tapers. No R8 though.

    But aside from changes in metallurgy, the 1920's edition is still pretty good. Has some nice engravings. And now public domain. Standard machine screws sizes, for example, have been around since then though the preferred sizes have changed and many sizes and thread/size combinations have been eliminated (just as the original standard eliminated some of the existing size/thread combinations). Lathe tools back then were forged. Coolants were something you made up in the shop or a common substance. Involute gears used a 14-1/2 degree pressure angle then. Big glossary that was lost in the 1955 ed. Machinery's is about 3 times the page count vs the 1920 edition of American. BTW, for metallurgy, MIL-HDBK-5J has more info.
    And the 1920 edition of American of course has historic value.

    I also have a couple dozen volumes of Machinery's Reference Series, circa 1910 and one of Machinery's data sheets. These were 48 page booklets which offered as incentives (you could buy up to 10 at $0.25 each for each year of subscription/renewal to the magazine.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/America...t%27s_Handbook
    http://www.statemaster.com/encyclopedia/Fred-H.-Colvin

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    544

    Default

    I have the ninth edition. American Machinist's Handbook. It was my grandfathers and my fathers. it was printed in 1932(I think) I actually still use it alot.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Taylor Michigan
    Posts
    87

    Default

    22nd here i think it caused me to need glasses

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Central Queensland, Australia
    Posts
    2,186

    Default

    26th in print, 27th in pdf cheep cheep

    I actually find the Machinery's Handbook just has too much info....Great for odd things but I have an Australian book written for apprentices...It has all the stuff you generally need for the workshop without it being 2000 pages long https://www.machineryhouse.com.au/Pr...stockCode=L341

  5. #15
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    1,572

    Default

    5th & 25th.
    Don't use the 5th much, it came with a toolchest I bought.
    If I want to look up old stuff, I turn to some old British books first.

    Tim

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 1999
    Location
    SE OZ
    Posts
    1,966

    Default Value

    I agree with you Ringer.

    I use that book too and I've been around for a while.

    Pound for pound and $ for $, I doubt that there is a better book published for all levels of HSM Shop and Jobbing and General work anywhere.

    I have MHB 27 - small print (wrong decision - PITA) and CD/DVD (much better). I am thinking about buying the large print version of MHB 28, But I don't think it is worth it.
    Last edited by oldtiffie; 12-03-2009 at 05:11 AM.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Yorkshire, Centre of the known Universe
    Posts
    1,891

    Default

    Fifth - 1918 Complete with cracked spine.

    Regards Ian.
    You might not like what I say,but that doesn't mean I'm wrong.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    North Central Oklahoma
    Posts
    232

    Default

    I have the 26th hardback and on CD. My dad recently retired and closed down his shop. He has been bringing me lots of tooling and materials that he no longer has a use for, and in the last batch he included the 19th edition MHB that I gave him a few years back.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Bruno, Arkansas and Tallahassee, Florida
    Posts
    948

    Wink Re: Machineries Handbook

    I have the 19th edition that I got through a deal from the tool and die company I apprenticed with back in 1972. I also have a 14th and a 22 that my father in law picked up for me in the flea markets. Great books with more info than I could ever remember.
    Jim (KB4IVH)

    Only fools abuse their tools.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Madison Wisconsin
    Posts
    130

    Default

    I have a 2nd edition, 10th edition, 22nd edition and the 26th edition of the Machinery's Handbook. I didn't use the older editions much untill it came to repairing some of my own macine tools. I have a lathe that was built in the early 1900's and a horizontal milling machine built around 1935.

    The older editions have quite a bit of "obsolete" information especially surrounding thread pitches. It seems a lot of the older machine tools used fasteners with proprietory threads in an attempt to get the customers back for repair parts. None of the pitches or thread dimensions show up in the later editions.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •