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Thread: Bandsaw coolant, home made, what do you use?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Stevens Point, WI
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    4,610

    Default Bandsaw coolant, home made, what do you use?

    I have tried a few different things for coolant in my bandsaw. First I tryed watered down blue windseild washer fluid, it worked great but made the saw rusty. Than I tried mixing a little oil with it and it cooled well yet but didn't seam like enought to keep the saw from getting rusty. Lastly I tried strait ATF fluid which worked great for not making rust but it is to much lubricant and makes the blade slip on the wheel.

    I know you can buy a coolant but I hear a couple different stories of it being expensive and it will start to stink after awhile.

    So what do you guys use for coolant? Any good working home made suff that doesn't start to stink, doesn't make the saw rust, and doesn't make the saw slip?

    I just never used the coolant because I was cutting small stuff or tubing which never had the need for coolant. But lately I have been cutting bigger and bigger stock and more repetitively and it would be nice to be able to use coolant if the need arises.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Oak Ridge Tenessee
    Posts
    245

    Default home made coolant

    Here is a recipe for some home made coolant. At a cost of around 50 cents a gallon

    1 quart cheep motor oil
    3 cups liquid dish washing soap
    4 gallons water

    The water acts as a coolant and the oil acts as a rust preventative
    Adding the soap will allow the oil to mix with water


    If you get a sticky residue on your machine you have to much soap.
    If mixed just right you will get a thin layer of oil on your machine and tools after the water evaporates.
    __________________

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Suffolk, England
    Posts
    1,263

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Machinist-Guide
    Here is a recipe for some home made coolant. At a cost of around 50 cents a gallon

    1 quart cheep motor oil
    3 cups liquid dish washing soap
    4 gallons water

    The water acts as a coolant and the oil acts as a rust preventative
    Adding the soap will allow the oil to mix with water


    If you get a sticky residue on your machine you have to much soap.
    If mixed just right you will get a thin layer of oil on your machine and tools after the water evaporates.
    __________________
    Bad idea IMO.
    Most dish washing soaps contain salt in some proportion, so you're just adding to the corrosion potential.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    136

    Default

    Machinist-guide... how do you use this solution? spray on? dripped on?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Corvallis,Oregon
    Posts
    24

    Default Soft knurling on ring roller

    The knurling wore smothe on my ring roller after only running a few 1" hot roll pices through.
    Is there a way to harden the roller after reknurling it?

    Steve

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Oak Ridge Tenessee
    Posts
    245

    Default spray

    Quote Originally Posted by wagnerite
    Machinist-guide... how do you use this solution? spray on? dripped on?
    I use it in a spray bottle. It separates pretty fast so I don't use it in a coolant tank.
    And if you use the lemon scent soap your shop will smell nice and lemony fresh.

    If you use it in a coolant tank with a pump it will be ok. After it sits over night it will separate and you will need to mix it
    Last edited by Machinist-Guide; 01-12-2010 at 03:54 AM.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Oak Ridge Tenessee
    Posts
    245

    Default case harden

    Quote Originally Posted by steve herman
    The knurling wore smothe on my ring roller after only running a few 1" hot roll pices through.
    Is there a way to harden the roller after reknurling it?

    Steve
    Steve search the forum for case harden this may be your best bet. There are post on this subject that can help.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    No Cal.
    Posts
    1,622

    Default

    5 gal of Rustlix = $100

    Rustlix mixed 1:15 with Water = 75 gal / $1.33 per gal

    not worth rusting out your tools

    Rustlix is a synthetic so it doesn't go rancid. A 5 Gal bucket last about 18 months around here being run in all my tools.
    Last edited by JoeFin; 01-12-2010 at 06:52 AM.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Luton,UK
    Posts
    1,779

    Default

    My friend Bob (Humbernut) is using Biocool 14 (from www.hallettoil.co.uk) and reports that it has lasted at least two years with intermittent use. I think that many of the synthetic coolants that form a translucent (usually green) working fluid will keep for a long time.

    Going 'bad' is associated with anerobic bacteria, so making sure the surface isn't covered with tramp oil is a good idea. If you're leaving machines idke for long periods, then consider an aquarium air pump on a timer.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Canada, Bc
    Posts
    7,589

    Default

    What exactly is 'tramp' oil anyway?
    I really would'nt bother making your own.. I use pure rapidtap dribbled on everything and I barly use more then a few drops per job and the job gets totaly coated.
    You don't even really need coolant for your bandsaw unless your doing super thick peices or you want every last ounce of blade life, and even then you can just dribble some rapidtap or similar into the cut every 20 seconds.

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