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Thread: Diamond Laps for dressing HSS

  1. #1
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    Default Diamond Laps for dressing HSS

    I would like to ask another question at this point re. The use of diamond laps on HSS. I have allways reserved these for dressing carbide. Maybe this is just a carryover from not grinding steel with the diamond wheel. Finish dressing with a stone is kind of slow. So, Is it a sound practic to use diamond to dress HSS?
    Byron Boucher
    Burnet, TX

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boucher
    I would like to ask another question at this point re. The use of diamond laps on HSS. I have allways reserved these for dressing carbide. Maybe this is just a carryover from not grinding steel with the diamond wheel. Finish dressing with a stone is kind of slow. So, Is it a sound practic to use diamond to dress HSS?
    Diamond (carbon) can be absorbed into steel WHEN the temperatures are high enough. temp, not heat (so coolant won't help much). The single biggest determinant of temp at the exact point where the molecule of diamond meets that of steel, is surface speed.

    result is diamond shouldn't be used on a steel at speed, but a hand lap (unless you're very fast) imo isn't going to hurt it

    being cheap, i keep the diamond laps for carbide and use a two side water stone (they're vast cutting) that's kept in a bucket for hss

  3. #3
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    Mcgyver: being cheaper, I only bought a set of diamond laps to use on everything.

  4. #4
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    Being not so cheap, but possibly of somewhat questionable sanity, I made myself a slo-mo diamond grinder for Carbide or HSS tools, and, in this illustration, my whittler:



    Here's the full write-up:

    http://www.frets.com/HomeShopTech/Pr...nkgrinder.html
    Cheers,

    Frank Ford
    HomeShopTech

  5. #5
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    I use one of the 'diamond stones' at the top of this page to finish my HSS grinds when I need a good finish.
    I think (but not certain, its a while since I bought it) its the 600 grit one.
    Works fine, and is also good for finishing other bits and pieces off, polishing up stuff and general use like a flat(ish) piece of abrasive.
    I find that flushing it with WD40/IPA/Light oil whilst in use helps it cut better and not clog so easily.

    Dave

  6. #6
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    Frank, not only are you the most ingenious shop tech on the Net, your photographic skills are superb. Did you use a light tent for that photo? If so, do you have a picture of it?

    Orrin
    So many projects. So little time.

  7. #7
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    Frank. That would make a good start on on a slow speed motorized
    version. And add a water trough to run the wheel in. I would think
    about 100 to 150 RPM would be a dream. Sort of a home made
    "Glendo".
    ...lew...

  8. #8
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    The commercial Glendo works really well. I picked an old one up (5" wheel) a while back. It's so old Glendo had forgotten they made it, but it works fine. Puts a really nice edge on HSS, and is very good on carbide, such as scrapers, etc.

    I spray the wheel with water (with a tiny bit of soap in it so it wets) to act as a lube/coolant.

    The wheel is quite slow, maybe 200 RPM.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Ford
    Being not so cheap, but possibly of somewhat questionable sanity, I made myself a slo-mo diamond grinder for Carbide or HSS tools, and, in this illustration, my whittler:
    Frank.. I am always amazed by your ingenuity, craftsmanship and like said, photo quality. Very cool machine... JR

  10. #10
    Join Date
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    SE OZ
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    Default True grit

    Quote Originally Posted by Boucher
    I would like to ask another question at this point re. The use of diamond laps on HSS. I have allways reserved these for dressing carbide. Maybe this is just a carryover from not grinding steel with the diamond wheel. Finish dressing with a stone is kind of slow. So, Is it a sound practic to use diamond to dress HSS?
    Its always going to be "kind of slow" if you (have to?) (hand?) dress the whole face.

    That happens with flat faces.

    "Hollow grind" your faces and it will be better and faster and quite often can be done in situ in the lathe.

    I haven't seen anything on the literature that came with my diamond hand hones ("sticks") that said that they were only to be used exclusively for TC.

    I use mine all the time in knives, garden shears, secateurs, kitchen knives, HSS and even on TC. I use a file or the pedestal grinder where needed as well. It all works OK.

    I wash mine in hot water with kitchen sink dishes detergent. I scrub them with a fine wire brush to get all the "gunk" out of the diamond face. I scratch it with a finger nail and if it feels "gritty" its OK.

    I've had some of mine for years - some are relatively new.

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