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Thread: Shop Made Tools

  1. #1441
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
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    Arkansas
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    13

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    Quote Originally Posted by lbhsbz View Post
    A couple points of note:

    Generally, when making a fly cutter...it's better to have the slot cut such that the cutting edge of the tool will be on center with the spindle. This is not to say that the way you did it will not work, but sharpening will be tough, because you've now got to grind the tip such that it is effectively on center...at least for best results.

    2: When using HSS blanks for your cutter, use a little dremmel stone to grind detents in the tool for the set screws to bite into. The vibrations present in flycutting will sometimes loosen up the screws just a touch, and the HSS will come out of the body like a bullet. Brazed tools don't have this problem because the substrate is generally softer and the screws can bit into the tool a bit more. Also, check the screws for tightness on a regular basis...between passes even. I still haven't found the piece of HSS that flew out of my flycutter a while back....I'm just glad it missed me.
    I was aware of the blade orientation, but I didn't have any material thick enough to hold both the blade and the shank at the same time and in the same plane. Since I only need it for plastic, it'll do the job for now. As soon as I can source some thicker metal I'll make another.

    Good point on the set screw divots.

  2. #1442
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Arkansas
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    13

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    Quote Originally Posted by drmico60 View Post
    I would also add that aluminium is not the best material for a flycutter because it is so light and this gives it very little flywheel effect. The inertia of a heavy holder means smoother cutting and less strain on the mill bearings during the intermittent cuts that are the norm when flycutting.
    Mike
    Yup, I was aware of that too. Just doin' the best I can with what I've got. I'm hoping to find a nice hunk of brass to make another with...

    I'm making fairly light passes in plastic, so I'm not pushing anything very hard.

  3. #1443
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Nevada, USA
    Posts
    384

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    If necessity is the mother of invention, then surely desperation is the father --humans often play the part of the midwife.
    so long as the offspring are successful all is well.


    Duuuuuuuude, you delivered a fine baby.

  4. #1444
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    N.E. Arizona
    Posts
    900

    Default Lathe compound & QC tool post

    Hi Everyone,

    I’ve been wanting to take photos of this and post them for ages & the mention of being ‘dirt poor’ was just the motivation I needed.

    Over 25 years ago, w/2 young children and a recent cross country move that took all our money, I needed a compound cross slide for a Hardinge DSM split bed lathe I had. From a flea market I had picked up a slide & used that for the lower cross slide. I just had to make the aluminum spacer to get the travel to work out correctly. The top compound I made entirely. I left stock on the curved portion for the day I would get a rotary table. I got one, oh … maybe 10 years ago. One of these days I'll finish this!



    The main thing I wanted to show is the QC tool post & tool holders that I also made.



    I thought up this design to be as simple as possible & use tools I already had. The block is expanded slightly by the 2 taper plugs being tightened together. I had 2 – 7 degree taper end mills on hand so that’s what determined the taper to cut from each side.





    Before anyone tries this, a word of warning …….. taper end mills are for cutting draft on the side of a part & not for making tapered holes. If you try to cut a full circle, the cutter will screw itself into the part & smash itself to bits.

    Don't ask me how I know, but I now have 1 taper end mill.

    For my next attempt, I set the quill stop to only let the cutter advance about .010 in. at a time so it couldn’t pull in. It took longer but was successful.
    Last edited by jhe.1973; 11-21-2017 at 11:31 PM.
    Best wishes to ya’ll.

    Sincerely,

    Jim

    "To invent you need a good imagination and a pile of junk" - Thomas Edison

    "I've always wanted to get a job as a procrastinator but I keep putting off going out to find one so I guess I'll never realize my life's dream. Frustrating!" - Me

  5. #1445
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Albuquerque
    Posts
    2,940

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    Re. 7 deg taper: I think that is 14 total from the look, but am wondering if
    it "tends" to stick like the "selfenergizing" tapers enough to be a bother when
    releasing the holder?
    ...lew...

  6. #1446
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Kansas City area
    Posts
    5,396

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    About 10 degrees included angle is the approximate dividing line between a self locking taper and a self releasing taper. The further you get either side of that mark, the more it does one or the other.

  7. #1447
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    N.E. Arizona
    Posts
    900

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    Hi Lew,

    I’m glad you brought up the sticking characteristic ‘cuz I was concerned also.

    When I assemble the inserts I coat them with an anti-seize lubricant to avoid the sticking. Plus, I keep a small block of aluminum or lead around any of my machines for tapping parts when I need to align them. When I release the screw I sometimes have to lightly tap it down which always does the trick.

    For me at least, the extra step of tapping the screw has become so automatic that it hardly can be considered to slow me down at all.

    The tool post & holders are all made from mild steel (hot rolled) so I made the holders a close, slip fit on the post to be sure the expansion required to lock them wasn’t enough to distort the post.

    I think that if the post is made from tool steel & heat treated to be a bit springy, the fit of the tool holders could be opened up which also might coax the tapered plugs to be completely self releasing.

    I have a couple of other lathes so I may make some more w/tool steel.

    This might be a good reason/project for me to hook up the heat treat furnace I’ve had lying around for 30+ years.

    Best wishes to ya’ll.

    Sincerely,

    Jim

    "To invent you need a good imagination and a pile of junk" - Thomas Edison

    "I've always wanted to get a job as a procrastinator but I keep putting off going out to find one so I guess I'll never realize my life's dream. Frustrating!" - Me

  8. #1448
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Long Beach
    Posts
    421

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    This is a fixture to measure brake rotor thickness variation. Some of the nicest work to come out of my garage....usually I just slap stuff together so it works on my own stuff...but this is for a paying customer.






  9. #1449
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    1,094

    Default

    I would have though watching a needle swing would be easier to see. I guess if you have a min/max setting, that would work too.

  10. #1450
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Nevada, USA
    Posts
    384

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    Yes, it is a nice bit of kit. I think he made that for a customer, I assume it was to the customers spec. I suspect the customer is planning to use it to show his customers why a rotor needs replaced --hence a digital readout (easier to get the point across to non machinist types, big numbers worse sort of thing --needle swinging is just a needle swinging).

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