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Thread: Shop Made Tools

  1. #1451
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Long Beach
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    421

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    Quote Originally Posted by + or - Zero View Post
    Yes, it is a nice bit of kit. I think he made that for a customer, I assume it was to the customers spec. I suspect the customer is planning to use it to show his customers why a rotor needs replaced --hence a digital readout (easier to get the point across to non machinist types, big numbers worse sort of thing --needle swinging is just a needle swinging).
    This was a bit of a rush....built it on the side, but for work. The boss gave me the project on Thursday of last week, and as usual, he wanted 2 of them yesterday. We didn't have much time for research or planning, so I just kinda did it. I had a feeling the electronic indicators would be a problem...and they were. I picked up a couple of dial comparator gauges today...and aside from being a bitch to set up, they work much better. We're gonna have a team using these 2 fixtures to check over 1000 brake rotors...don't ask why. The real bitch is the c-frame thing and the pivot...I musta recut the damn c-frame 20 times creeping up on the dimension....then polished the tool marks away just a bit to get a perfect fit. Made a fixture clamp them together so I could drill and ream in place to assure hole alignment....then polished 2/3 of the pin down to as near I can tell, about .0003 under size, while leaving 1/3 of it about .001 over size so it would stay in place, but the c-frame pivots freely and with zero play. Jus. Finished that up....need to make some thumbscrew handles, add a few stop screws, and we're done. Should be a chunk of change coming my way tomorrow. I'm about 40 hours into it I think....never thought it would take this long.

  2. #1452

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    One way to check an item for square is to use a surface gage. You use the ball end of the vertical rod as your lower reference and an indicator as the upper reference and a known square surface as the datum. My problem with this method is that it makes the fine adjust on the surface gage difficult to use. So I took a hard drive magnet, a chunk of aluminum and a small tooling ball and came up with this.







    Last edited by Harvey Melvin Richards; 12-14-2012 at 04:05 PM.

  3. #1453
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    West Michigan
    Posts
    2,709

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    Harvey,

    I can't see how that setup would be very accurate. If the tooling ball and the indicator point are not lined up exactly vertical, any rotation of the surface gage would result in error.

    If you have a known square surface, why not use it to check for squareness? Your setup kind of looks like a solution to something that is not a problem to begin with.

    Brian
    OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS, OPEN MIND

    THINK HARDER

    BETTER TO HAVE TOOLS YOU DON'T NEED THAN TO NEED TOOLS YOU DON'T HAVE

    MY NAME IS BRIAN AND I AM A TOOLOHOLIC

  4. #1454

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    Quote Originally Posted by bborr01 View Post
    Harvey,

    I can't see how that setup would be very accurate. If the tooling ball and the indicator point are not lined up exactly vertical, any rotation of the surface gage would result in error.

    If you have a known square surface, why not use it to check for squareness? Your setup kind of looks like a solution to something that is not a problem to begin with.

    Brian
    Greater minds than mine would disagree.

    http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/thr...eck+squareness

    And post #14 of this thread: http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/thr...740#post362740

    Tool and Die Guy video:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0tu9uyRG8ZM
    Last edited by Harvey Melvin Richards; 12-14-2012 at 05:35 PM. Reason: added another link

  5. #1455
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    West Michigan
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    2,709

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    Quote Originally Posted by Harvey Melvin Richards View Post
    Hi Harvey,

    I just watched the video and now I see how the technique is used. I have always used cylinder squares if I need to quantify the error or a solid square if I am just want to see how something looks by eye. I didn't pick up how they zero out the indicator to absolute square to begin with. How do you do that?

    Brian
    OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS, OPEN MIND

    THINK HARDER

    BETTER TO HAVE TOOLS YOU DON'T NEED THAN TO NEED TOOLS YOU DON'T HAVE

    MY NAME IS BRIAN AND I AM A TOOLOHOLIC

  6. #1456

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    Quote Originally Posted by bborr01 View Post
    Hi Harvey,

    I just watched the video and now I see how the technique is used. I have always used cylinder squares if I need to quantify the error or a solid square if I am just want to see how something looks by eye. I didn't pick up how they zero out the indicator to absolute square to begin with. How do you do that?

    Brian
    The way that I usually calibrate this device is with a cylinder square. The advantage of using the indicator is that you can quantify the amount that something is out of square.

  7. #1457
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    Jul 2007
    Location
    West Michigan
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harvey Melvin Richards View Post
    The way that I usually calibrate this device is with a cylinder square. The advantage of using the indicator is that you can quantify the amount that something is out of square.
    Why not just put the cylindrer square on your part and use and indicator on the cyl. square. It works fine for quantifying things.

    Brian
    OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS, OPEN MIND

    THINK HARDER

    BETTER TO HAVE TOOLS YOU DON'T NEED THAN TO NEED TOOLS YOU DON'T HAVE

    MY NAME IS BRIAN AND I AM A TOOLOHOLIC

  8. #1458

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    Quote Originally Posted by bborr01 View Post
    Why not just put the cylindrer square on your part and use and indicator on the cyl. square. It works fine for quantifying things.

    Brian
    I assume you are talking about a magnetic cylinder square, other wise I don't see how you would use an indicator, along with the part and a cylinder square. Also using the surface gage will work on non-ferrous parts.

    Brown & Sharpe makes (made) a cylinder square that sits on a slight tilt and has calibrations on it so by rotating it you can determine how far out of square a part is. I don't have the luxury of possessing this type of square.

  9. #1459
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    West Michigan
    Posts
    2,709

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    Quote Originally Posted by Harvey Melvin Richards View Post
    I assume you are talking about a magnetic cylinder square, other wise I don't see how you would use an indicator, along with the part and a cylinder square. Also using the surface gage will work on non-ferrous parts.

    Brown & Sharpe makes (made) a cylinder square that sits on a slight tilt and has calibrations on it so by rotating it you can determine how far out of square a part is. I don't have the luxury of possessing this type of square.
    Yes, magnetic cylinder square.

    Brian
    OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS, OPEN MIND

    THINK HARDER

    BETTER TO HAVE TOOLS YOU DON'T NEED THAN TO NEED TOOLS YOU DON'T HAVE

    MY NAME IS BRIAN AND I AM A TOOLOHOLIC

  10. #1460
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    9,874

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    Harvey, that has to be the best example of case hardening colours i've seen on that surface gauge.

    Brian, using a tenths indicator this is both very accurate and handy. Lots of guys grind the front of surface gauge flat for this. Using the ball, you sweep the indicator so things don't have to be perfectly lined up - ball and point should be close to aligned but exactness isn't required. You don't need a magnetic cylinder square which are not super common, in fact this method is a good way to check cylindrical squares.

    Like many tasks, there are lots of ways to do things but this one is fundamental and very accurate. By fundamental I mean you don't need much and it can be used to create squareness where no other method of checking exists. For example armed with this, a cube of metal and surface grinder or scraper, perfect squareness can be created.
    .

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