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Thread: Shop Made Tools

  1. #491
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Laplace, La
    Posts
    16

    Default

    To cut whatever angle you want. Other places sell nothers that are similar to that but you use an electric drill and holesaw with a fixture. I like this way much better plus it would seem it probably holds the pipe better. Then you always have the auto feed like he says.

  2. #492
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Hendersonville, TN
    Posts
    59

    Default

    jc250r31 is right, I'm doing an angled notch in that picture. I had a picture of the notch completed from the setup in the second picture, but there is a 4 pic rule here and that was the one that had to go. The third picture is a new setup. I use the angle graduations on the cross-slide/compound to set my angle. The other plus to this setup is that I could use roughing endmills in place of the holesaws if I want. Although an 1 3/4" roughing mill is big $$$. Equivalent purpose built notchers typically sell for $4k and they don't have power feed. I have roughly 1/4 of that in my setup including the cost of the lathe.
    Last edited by medwards; 03-25-2010 at 08:42 PM.

  3. #493
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    SE, Michigan
    Posts
    2,057

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jc250r31
    To cut whatever angle you want. Other places sell nothers that are similar to that but you use an electric drill and holesaw with a fixture. I like this way much better plus it would seem it probably holds the pipe better. Then you always have the auto feed like he says.
    I built one like that a while ago. People thought I was an idiot when I said we should use the lathe to notch tubing (FSAE). Slick and smooth, and doesn't tear up as many holesaws as the aformentioned drill press version.

  4. #494
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Location
    Saranac Lake, NY
    Posts
    350

    Default tubing notcher

    Very cool! I take it the V-jaw is movable, it sits astride the fixed jaw, and is simply pushed from behind by the clamp screw? What prevents it from riding up when tightened? How do you get and clamp the rotary motion?

  5. #495
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    SE, Michigan
    Posts
    2,057

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by alsinaj
    Very cool! I take it the V-jaw is movable, it sits astride the fixed jaw, and is simply pushed from behind by the clamp screw? What prevents it from riding up when tightened? How do you get and clamp the rotary motion?
    I assumed it was the other way around, that the V-Jaw was fixed, so the flat jaw can ride up as much or as little as it likes and the pipe will still be firmly planted.

    I make this assumption based upon the SHCS on the lateral edges of the V block.

  6. #496
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Hendersonville, TN
    Posts
    59

    Default

    Correct, the V-jaw is fixed. The other jaw of the vise floats in sort of a box way under the v-jaw. With the V-jaw fixed, the tube is always positioned in the same place. It's a very simple setup.

    alsinaj -The rotary motion and clamping are the same as the compound would be on the lathe. The two t-bolts that hold the compound on, also hold the riser.

  7. #497
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    4

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Evan
    This is my favorite shop made tool. It is a slotter that mounts on the cross slide in place of the compound on my South Bend 9. It can make gears, dial markings, cog belt pulleys, splines and of course keyways, internal and external. Different size tool holders can be fitted to the business end to work in small openings or large.








    Sir, that is a beautiful tool.

  8. #498

    Default

    I build 18th century flintlocks (actually I putter but they do get finished eventually ) and part of that is holding the brass or steel furniture parts while I finish them. Cast pieces have a lot of flash along the edges. I trashed one ram rod thimble befor I started making these. I have several sizes - parts from one brass casting set are often different in size.

    I turn down a shaft so there is a sliding fit for the part, drill and tap it for a hex head screw. The end part I'm going to cut off is drilled a slopy clearance fit for the screw so it moves.


    Then I slice it about in half on an angle. I slide on the thimble tighten up on the screw head with an allen wrench (I've also used screws). The angle cut moves against itself and holds the part tight.





    I can hold the part in a vise without damaging it and work all the way around the piece.
    Jerry Crawford
    I, also, have tools I don't know how to use

  9. #499
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Texas Hill Country
    Posts
    106

    Default

    Very nice, Jerry. I surely would like to see some of your 'eventually finished' work.

    Mark

  10. #500

    Default

    Here's a Hawken style half stock planes rifle I completed a few years ago. Kinda hard to see any details but it shoots really well - 54 caliber. This was made from a bunch of parts I bought at Friendship Indiana one year. The walnut stock was a blank and all the parts were cast steel. Lot of hand work. Took me months to get it finished.

    Jerry Crawford
    I, also, have tools I don't know how to use

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