Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Help identify Craftsman Lathe

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Europe
    Posts
    1,431

    Default Help identify Craftsman Lathe

    Let's hope this link works:
    http://www.subito.it/tornio-parallel...a-10657499.htm

    There are three pictures on this page (its Italian).. the first picture
    is of an "AVM125" whatever that is.. the second one is an old
    craftsman lathe.

    Am wondering if someone might recognize it / model number?
    recommendations? I'm looking for a small benchtop.

    Thanks.
    -Tony

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Louisville, KY
    Posts
    2,007

    Default

    See here.

    Looks like a late 30s Deluxe model.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Toledo, Ohio
    Posts
    9,068

    Default

    It is the later Craftsman version of the Atla lathe. it is a 12" swing with Timken bearings and power cross feed. It is thread cutting, but is a change gear lathe. It looks like the longest bed, with 36" between centers.

    It is a good lathe, but 60-70 years old. Look for wear on the bed, and make sure all the gears are there. It is not an industrial machine and light cuts are the order of the day.
    Jim H.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    4

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tony Ennis
    See here.

    Looks like a late 30s Deluxe model.
    The lathe appears to be Sears/Craftsman Deluxe model #101-07403, 12" swing by 36" between centers, with 16 speeds (assuming the original pulleys and back gear are still present). The bed length is 54", and overall length is ~58". This model was produced from 1939-1958 with few changes. If the gray paint is original (appears so), this lathe was built after 1940, before which the color was blue (and I believe the Craftsman badge was located on the headstock instead of the carriage apron), but before 1958, after which the lathe's design changed considerably. It was quite popular for light industrial and home shop use. The tail-end lead screw bearing/bracket may have been changed, and the knob/handwheel on the end of the lead screw is definitely not original. An accessory, drum-type reversing switch has been added to the front of the head-stock housing.

    Andy

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Tucson AZ
    Posts
    1,530

    Default

    It's not worth the freight from Italy.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Birmingham, AL
    Posts
    1,037

    Default

    1300 Euros is prolly 2.5x to 4x its cost new. Sears was selling lathes of the later design, similar
    to that in their tools catalog for $1300 in the early to late '70s, peaking
    out at about $1800 in 1980 when all the machine tools disappeared from
    the Sears catalogs. A pre WW11 lathe is worth perhaps 1/3 to 40% of this asking price.
    Steve

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •