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Thread: "Nominal Current" question

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Live Oak, TEXAS
    Posts
    1,414

    Default "Nominal Current" question

    My VFD has a parameter setting for "Motor Nominal Current - Allowed Range .2 to 2.0 * /2nA (must be equal to value on motor rating plate).
    HUH ????
    My motor plate has nothing labled about "Nominal Current".
    230volt
    5.8 Amp
    60Hz
    3 Phase
    2Hp
    Ser. F. 1.15
    Rating 40c
    What should I enter for this parameter?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Palmer Alaska
    Posts
    748

    Default

    Strange wording
    I would just put in 5.8

    If it won't take that, than 1.0
    Last edited by Bguns; 02-17-2010 at 08:24 PM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    winnipeg/manitoba
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    144

    Default

    Are you sure your VFD is sized for your motor? Nominal current should be the nameplate rate. If it is rated for 6 Amp-then enter the highest nominal value. If the VFD is not rated for 6 amps-then you will have a problem...

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Live Oak, TEXAS
    Posts
    1,414

    Default

    Nope, the VFD is rated at 16.8 Amps, 240 volt.
    So I guess I should enter the Amp rating- 5.8?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Woodinville, WA
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    4,733

    Default

    Yes.. it's just the nameplate current. It's "nominal" because any motor can exceed this number... The VFD is smart enough to allow short term overloads based on this number.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    winnipeg/manitoba
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    Default

    Allowed Range .2 to 2.0 * /2nA (must be equal to value on motor rating plate).

    Are you sure about the 0.2 to 2.0 value? The "must be equal to motor nameplate", is the right answer. Your values above are whats throwing a bit of caution into the mix. If the drive accepts your nameplate value 0f 5.8 Amps-then you're golden Nothing like commissioning to lose some hair over.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Live Oak, TEXAS
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    Default

    Yeah, the ".2-2.0" value is in the operator's handbook. The handbook is written for European settings, not U.S.A.
    If the handbook were published in the U.S. it would be in 5 different languages, with 5 different conversion equivalents. Political Correctness.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Wenatchee, Washington USA
    Posts
    462

    Default

    Kidd,

    Is there anywhere in the setup to enter 'motor full load' current? If there is then the above mentioned setting MIGHT be for the service factor (SF) on your nameplate. This is just a maybe... I really have no idea from your description. I would call ABB's support line, the number should be in the book or on-line if the book only lists European numbers, and ask them what it means. I have seldom had to call ABB but when I have they were very helpful and knowledgeable.

    Edit: I found the link to the manual in your other post and the answer is...... I have no idea what they want . I would call ABB in the morning and have them explain what they want. If you do call and get the answer PLEASE let us know what they said. I would really like the answer explained to me.

    Robin
    Last edited by rdfeil; 02-17-2010 at 10:06 PM.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    16,285

    Default

    Looking at the ACS320 manual, page 129, code 9906 motor nominal current

    the setting of 0.2 to 2.0 is with reference to the drive current.

    So you should be able to put in the motor current as per the nameplate. the drive will either accept it or not, depending on what the rating is. If the drive is suitable for your motor, as it seems it should be, it will take it.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    212

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by KiddZimaHater
    Yeah, the ".2-2.0" value is in the operator's handbook. The handbook is written for European settings, not U.S.A.
    If the handbook were published in the U.S. it would be in 5 different languages, with 5 different conversion equivalents. Political Correctness.
    Nah - them's probably Euro-Amps. They's bigger than U.S.A. amps. Probably metric, too. Maybe you gotta multiply or divide by Pie or sumthin.

    -bill (Who is waiting for Nurse Diesel to come with his injection)

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