Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: Nitriding Verses Chrome?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    233

    Post Nitriding Verses Chrome?

    I am building Fifty Hydraulic Cylinders with my Husband for a Customer. I was told that Nitriding is a more durable Prep on the Shafting than chrome. What do you Guys say about this? Nitriding doesnt chip when hit by rocks like chrome can. We have used Heavy Service Chroming on the Shafts before. .001 per side thickness but the Nitriding will be cheaper perhaps in the Long Run. Thanx Audrey

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Bremerton Washington
    Posts
    5,011

    Post

    Nitriding does little for corrosion protection. It will rust. Whereas chrome will not.

    If the cylinders are protected from moisture as in an indoor packaging operation, I'd think that nitride cylinder rods might be superior.

    Personally, I'd go for the chrome rod I can get from CK in Seattle. It's the industry standard was of doing things and the chrome will not rust. It goes without saying that cylinders have to be mounted out of the way of damage. If the rods are subject to damage that's a design problem.

    [This message has been edited by Forrest Addy (edited 10-29-2003).]

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Green Bay, WI
    Posts
    2,566

    Post

    I like Nitriding, and the Diameter will enlarge after treatment, so you may not have to worry about OD.
    The one thing that can throw a monkey wrench in it, is that sometimes nitriding will warp the shaft, even though it only sees 800 degrees. I believe that if the HT holds them vertical, no problem occurs, but you need to talk to them first.

    From a cost point of view, I think that available preplated(Chrome)"shafting" should be cheaper ??

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    On the Oil Coast,USA
    Posts
    16,858

    Post

    The properties of chrome-vs-nitrobar are very similar,but both will rust,the nitrobar is used in automotive applications such as shock absorbers,the one advantage it has is that there is no chrome to flake off,on the other hand the chrome rod is more abrasion resistant.

    The chrome rod comes in two basic types,1045 and 1050,one is good to 75,000psi and he other is good to 125,000psi which brings me to a good point,the main thing you must consider in designing hydrualic cylinders is column load,this will affect your material choice more than chrome or not.

    When your cylinder is at full extention what will the total load be?Also what will the diameter and extended length be?
    I just need one more tool,just one!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •