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Thread: What is 50/50 silver solder?

  1. #1
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    Default What is 50/50 silver solder?

    I've seen this mentioned, assume it is 50% silver, but what else is in there?

    Anyone know?

  2. #2
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    That is just one possible alloy of silver with something else, usually copper. There is a huge variety of silver based brazing alloys.


    This is the Handy Harman Brazing Book. It is the online bible of silver soldering and brazing.

    http://www.handyharmancanada.com/The...k/contents.htm
    Last edited by Evan; 02-27-2010 at 02:42 PM.
    Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Origin now settable to bottom left! All values positive. Click Here

  3. #3
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    Thanks for the information Evan. I'm familiar with the variety of alloys and the BAg numbering system, but I'm looking at some old stuff made by
    Garrett & Davidson, probably from Australia, that is simply labeled "50/50 silver solder". I was hoping to be able to find out what is equivalent to.

  4. #4
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    From a search on the web the inference is the silevr solder is just a replacement for 50/50 tin/lead solder.
    Not found anything with 50% silver and another metal.
    I think it is just advertising speak for a non lead replacement!

    Peter
    I have tools I don't know how to use!!

  5. #5
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    What is 50/50 silver solder?
    It's solder that likes both boys and girls.

    Sorry, I couldn't resist. HEY LIGHTEN UP, GUYS!
    Sometimes the professional is hidebound by tradition while the skilled amateur, not knowing it can't be done blazes a new trail. -JCHannum

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by ptjw7uk
    From a search on the web the inference is the silevr solder is just a replacement for 50/50 tin/lead solder.
    Not found anything with 50% silver and another metal.
    I think it is just advertising speak for a non lead replacement!

    Peter
    That is possible, check to see how hard it is. If you can dent it with your thumbnail, it is a soft solder.

    Silver solder can be 50% silver, but the balance is typically a combination of other metals, not just one.
    Jim H.

  7. #7
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    Default 50/50 Silver content etc.

    Hard solder
    Hard solders are used for brazing, and melt at higher temperatures. Alloys of copper with either zinc or silver are the most common.

    In silversmithing or jewelry making, special hard solders are used that will pass away assay. They contain a high proportion of the metal being soldered and lead is not used in these alloys. These solders vary in hardness, designated as "enamelling", "hard", "medium" and "easy". Enamelling solder has a high melting point, close to that of the material itself, to prevent the joint desoldering during firing in the enamelling process. The remaining solder types are used in decreasing order of hardness during the process of making an item, to prevent a previously soldered seam or joint desoldering while additional sites are soldered. Easy solder is also often used for repair work for the same reason. Flux or rouge is also used to prevent joints from desoldering.

    Silver solder is also used in manufacturing to join metal parts that cannot be welded. The alloys used for these purposes contain a high proportion of silver (up to 40%), and may also contain cadmium.
    from:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silver_solder#Hard_solder

    and:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silver_soldering


    I posted this to the Tower Talk reflector earlier in response to a thread
    there. Since many amp. builders use the silver soldering process in
    construction, especially at VHF/UHF, I thought it would be of interest here.

    73, Dave, K1FK
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Silver solders are generally used in applications requiring more than
    ordinary strength obtainable from tin-led solders, or to provide a specific
    color match, electrical conductivity, or corrosion resistance of the joined
    materials. Like tin-lead solders, silver solders come in numerous different
    alloys, each with it's specific purpose, and specific melting temperatures,
    which can vary anywhere from around 1200*F to over 1800*F, depending on the
    composition of the alloy. Tensile strengths of silver soldered joints can
    vary from a low of less than 5000 psi up to approximately 65,000 psi, again
    dependent upon the alloy used and type of material being joined.

    Some of the more common and economical silver solders are copper-zinc alloys
    with small amounts of silver added, and may contain anywhere from 9 to 80%
    silver, depending upon the intended application, desired melting point, and
    have a color varying from silver to a brass-yellow. They are generally
    applied using a brazing torch rather than soldering iron, although a few do
    lend themselves to soldering iron application. Some silver solders have a
    small amount of cadmium or indium added to lower the melting point.

    Most silver solders are corrosion-resistant, malleable, ductile, and have
    high strength, but care in preparing the materials to be soldered affect the
    solderability and ultimate strength. Lead and iron make them difficult to
    work with and any presence of tin makes the joint brittle and weak.

    A commonly available general purpose silver solder used for soldering of
    refrigeration equipment and electrical work can be found in the plumbing
    department of larger hardware stores, building supply outlets, and some
    larger hobby shops. It is an alloy of 50% silver, 34% copper, 16% zinc, has
    a melting point of ~1280*F, and meets the specifications of ASTM No. 5
    Silver Solder. This is best applied to larger tubing and lap joints using a
    small brazing torch, while solid copper wire up to 12 gauge may be
    effectively soldered with large-wattage soldering guns or large soldering
    irons having large-mass tips.

    There are some lead-silver solders available to replace regular tin-lead
    solders. They contain a very small percentage of indium and have melting
    points as low as 310*F. These generally flow better in prepared joints than
    regular tin-lead solders and produce joint tensile strengths approaching
    4900 psi. Most low-melting point silver solders fail in tensile strength at
    elevated temperatures (<900*F) and should be used with caution in such
    applications.

    A common flux used with silver solders is hydrous sodium borate (commonly
    known as Borax and obtainable in grocery and drug stores) which acts as a
    deoxidizer during the soldering process, and is non-corrosive to the
    adjoining metals (as well as the silver-soldered joint). This is most
    commonly used in the powder form by welders when brazing ferrous metals
    using brass/bronze uncoated rods and oxyacetylene torch brazing methods or
    available as coated rods for stick welding (brazing) using electric welding
    methods.

    Silver solders which do not require application of an external flux
    generally contain a small amount of phosphorus in the alloy which acts as a
    deoxidizer during application, and are generally used in brazing brass,
    bronze, and nickel alloys, but these are not easily obtainable in the retail
    market.
    from:
    http://lists.contesting.com/pipermai...ry/015467.html

    http://www.google.com.au/#hl=en&sour...cf0a553a95b437

  8. #8
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    Thanks for all your efforts guys, great information!

    Richard

  9. #9
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    Back in the late 1960's Silver solder was used in Military Products. It was 50% silver and it wet the surface great. I don't remember the other constituents but it was sure easy to work with.
    Byron Boucher
    Burnet, TX

  10. #10
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Evan
    That is just one possible alloy of silver with something else, usually copper. There is a huge variety of silver based brazing alloys.


    This is the Handy Harman Brazing Book. It is the online bible of silver soldering and brazing.

    http://www.handyharmancanada.com/The...k/contents.htm
    Top link, thanks for that.

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