Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 50

Thread: Welding on tire rim.

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Raleigh, NC
    Posts
    258

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by gnm109
    Thankfully the split rim wheels are no longer used. They are unnecessary with the advent of tubeless tires which are easier to install. I don't know if the split rims have been outlawed but I never see them anymore. Most large trucks I've seen have alloy wheels with standard tubeless rims nowadays.
    FYI, the equipment industry (i.e. tractors) still use split rims and they are common. Also, I have a friend who runs a truck dealership. About 4-5 years ago they had a mechanic killed by a split rim. Literally cut his head off, well, most of it. He filled the tire in the protective rack that you describe, then rolled the tire over to be mounted. While he was putting it on the truck the rim blew and killed him. OSHA ruled that all safety rules had been followed and it was unavoidable.
    Dan from Raleigh, NC

    If it's stupid but it works, it's not stupid.
    _____________________
    "What is your host's purpose for the party? Surely not for you to enjoy yourself; if that were their sole purpose, they'd have sent champagne and women over to your place by taxi." P.J. O'Rourke

  2. #12
    gnm109 Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MrDan
    FYI, the equipment industry (i.e. tractors) still use split rims and they are common. Also, I have a friend who runs a truck dealership. About 4-5 years ago they had a mechanic killed by a split rim. Literally cut his head off, well, most of it. He filled the tire in the protective rack that you describe, then rolled the tire over to be mounted. While he was putting it on the truck the rim blew and killed him. OSHA ruled that all safety rules had been followed and it was unavoidable.

    Well, that's really good to know. I had no idea that they were still using them in the tractor industry. Those things are areally dangerous. When I was a safety consultant at a workers compensation insurer there were numerous injuries and deaths at insured companies. Even with the cages, there's no way to make them safe. Even if they don't blow when the tire is first inflated, the split rims can catch on the bead and still break a few minutes or an hour later when the pressure drives them to the edge of the wheel.

    I'm pretty sure that the large truck builders no longer use them with the advent of tubeless tires. They still use retread tires, though. Whenever I go on highway 99 or I-5 through California, I see the "gators" (stripped tire treads) all over the road. Nice.


    .

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    476

    Default

    Obviously it is fairly easy to start the pyrolysis process in rubber. From a quick search I was able to find approximate temperatures for rubber.

    400-850C (752-1562F)

    At the standardized temperatures below it would not take much to start this chain reaction even if the weld is towards the center of the rim.

    Oxy-Acetylene Flame: 3100C
    Electric Arc Welding Temperatures: 6,000-8,000 C

  4. #14
    MuellerNick Guest

    Default

    400-850C
    Thanks for the heads-up! I wasn't aware of that and might have done it.
    Seems that's a 100% chance for a fail with tubed tires. Tubless and welding at the right spot might not hurt. But not worth trying.


    Nick

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Arkansas
    Posts
    626

    Default

    I noticed in the video that the demonstration was on a large truck tire and the other pictures were from large earth moving equipment. Apparently it's not a common problem with the smaller automotive type tire. But then, why would someone want to weld on their Lincoln or Cadillac rims? Oh wait, I live in a town where the locals would do just that if there was an accessory to be added to the rims that would make them more showy or glitzzy. (Heh, heh kinda like more bling for the bang)LOL.

    Patrick

  6. #16
    gnm109 Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by HSS
    I noticed in the video that the demonstration was on a large truck tire and the other pictures were from large earth moving equipment. Apparently it's not a common problem with the smaller automotive type tire. But then, why would someone want to weld on their Lincoln or Cadillac rims? Oh wait, I live in a town where the locals would do just that if there was an accessory to be added to the rims that would make them more showy or glitzzy. (Heh, heh kinda like more bling for the bang)LOL.

    Patrick
    I believe that the pyrolysis would happen even faster with a thinner rim and a lighter tire. The principal is the same. I've heard about these and other tire-oriented accidents for many years.

    There have been accidents with the automatic tire changers when the operator accidentally shoves the bead breaker through an inflated tire. That can cause a nasty explosion.

    Another issue is battery explosions when people install battery chargers and cause a spark. This can ignite the loose hydrogen and blow acid over the victim.

    There should be a redneck automotive division for the Darwin Awards.

    It's a jungle out there in the auto shop. LOL.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Arkansas
    Posts
    626

    Default

    [QUOTE=gnm109]I believe that the pyrolysis would happen even faster with a thinner rim and a lighter tire. The principal is the same. I've heard about these and other tire-oriented accidents for many years. [QUOTE]


    One would think that might be the case but, I see stock cars racing at night with the brake rotors glowing cherry red and at times in the pits the wheel wells right behind the tires on fire. The guy on the demonstration video mentioned hot or stuck brake components causing pyrolysis, why wouldn't the same thing happen on stock cars? Or then again, maybe it does and the anouncer hasn't a clue why the tire went down at 165 mph. Inquiring minds want to know.

    Patrick

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Delaware
    Posts
    764

    Default

    That's scary . I have to wonder about tires on race cars , that heat up due to high speed operation, cornering, and braking. Add to that the heat from red hot brake rotors , and I wonder how far those tires are from the pyrolysis phenomenon ?

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Arkansas
    Posts
    626

    Default

    How would you like to be one of those tire changers when one pops?

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    On the Oil Coast,USA
    Posts
    16,773

    Default

    [QUOTE=HSS][QUOTE=gnm109]I believe that the pyrolysis would happen even faster with a thinner rim and a lighter tire. The principal is the same. I've heard about these and other tire-oriented accidents for many years.


    One would think that might be the case but, I see stock cars racing at night with the brake rotors glowing cherry red and at times in the pits the wheel wells right behind the tires on fire. The guy on the demonstration video mentioned hot or stuck brake components causing pyrolysis, why wouldn't the same thing happen on stock cars? Or then again, maybe it does and the anouncer hasn't a clue why the tire went down at 165 mph. Inquiring minds want to know.

    Patrick
    There are two factors in the reaction beginning.Heat and pressure.It's possible that the lower pressures used in car tires might provide an extra buffer.
    I just need one more tool,just one!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •