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Thread: What did you do today?

  1. #821
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    Watford, UK
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    288

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    If that's the tailstock as seen in Tubalcain's video then no...that's not a small piece! My workpiece was well clamped down but, being more used to either a vice or direct clamping, I'd neglected to lock the rotary table. Drilled the hole, no problem....which was why it was more of a surprise when the table started helicoptering and took out the indicator holder I'd been using to gauge drilling depth. Nothing broken and the cheap indicator is probably more accurate for a good clouting!

  2. #822
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
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    Watford, UK
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    288

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    I really should have written yesterday off as a bad day to be in the shop. All the evidence was there: mistakes, injurys, swearing. But no, even having to start again (because I'd drilled a hole in the second end too big and through instead of blind) didn't stop me. Stubborn like a mule!
    I did learn that whilst you can hacksaw off the top of a clamp stud to get enough clearance to continue milling your circle without moving the workpiece....unless you file the top of it, it's entirely possible for the burr to line up and just the perfect angle to slice through your finger like butter. Superglue is my friend!
    At least got one one done and the other prepped for when I have time.





    Is there a better way (and I really mean easier!) of clamping small pieces to a rotary table? I figured I'd use the 4-jaw self-centring lathe chuck but because the arcs and circles being cut are so small and/or full depth of the part, I couldn't get it to clear the jaws. Ended up having to clamp it direct to table but the only alignment I have is to shove a tap in the hole and hold that in a centred drill chuck whilst I clamp. Would be nice to be able to pull it out, spin it round and do the other side without losing placement - like a vice with a stop.

  3. #823
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Stevens Point, WI
    Posts
    7,246

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cenedd View Post

    Is there a better way (and I really mean easier!) of clamping small pieces to a rotary table?


    Yeah, you use a washer for a spacer and save all the machining ops.
    Andy

  4. #824
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    Watford, UK
    Posts
    288

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    Totally. I could also file and sand the clearance at the end or just mill it off square ….but where's the fun in that?! Plan to try some Birchwood Casey Super Blue on it when I've finished.

  5. #825
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    783

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    Quote Originally Posted by CCWKen View Post
    Was on my way to the barn (shop) and happened to glance down on the pathway. YIKES! About a 4' Diamond Back was sunning on the path. Ran (a quick hobble) back to the house to get backup. When I came back out, he had moved over near the garden. Had to dispatch him. All other nonvenomous snakes are welcome but not the rattlers.

    Doc wants me to lose some weight so each morning I walk 3.5 miles at a local park. In the last couple of weeks I have seen two moccasins (AKA cottonmouths) on the paved path where I walk. In both cases it was very early morning and I'm sure they were sunning themselves to get their juices flowing.

    A fellow machinist, a "country boy", told me his dad was once bitten by a water moccasin and he went blind for two days. Very nasty critters. Where I live there are only moccasins and copperheads. On another occasion my nephew got on his tractor one day and a baby copperhead which was about the size of a pencil bit him on the arm. Even that little bit of poison left him in very bad shape for about a week. He said his forearm swelled up to about the size of his calf.

    Your photo caught my attention because while visiting another nephew's home (I got a lot of nephews) we saw a snake which looked exactly like the one in your photo and about as large crossing the street in front of his house. He lives in a very urban part of town though there are some woods close by. The damn thing appeared huge and I'm all but positive that it was a copperhead. The stupid idiot (and he can be a stupid idiot at times) went out to the street and kicked it a few times despite my frantic cautions. Son of a bitch got away with it. You have to know the guy, he leads a very charmed life. If he fell into a bucket of sh!t he'd come out smelling like a rose. To this day I get shudders thinking what might have happened if he had gotten bit. That thing was big enough to have caused some serious harm. We have pigmy rattlers migrating into our neck of the woods I'm told, and as the queen might say ... "We are not amused."

  6. #826
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Stevens Point, WI
    Posts
    7,246

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    Quote Originally Posted by vpt View Post
    Yeah, you use a washer for a spacer and save all the machining ops.
    One option is to tack weld the part to a plate and hold the plate. Or some glue parts to plates. I think with what you have and done there a small vise would have been best.
    Andy

  7. #827

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cenedd View Post
    Is there a better way (and I really mean easier!) of clamping small pieces to a rotary table? I figured I'd use the 4-jaw self-centring lathe chuck but because the arcs and circles being cut are so small and/or full depth of the part, I couldn't get it to clear the jaws. Ended up having to clamp it direct to table but the only alignment I have is to shove a tap in the hole and hold that in a centred drill chuck whilst I clamp. Would be nice to be able to pull it out, spin it round and do the other side without losing placement - like a vice with a stop.
    If your just rounding the end of that off, clamp a pivot bar with a retaining nut vertical in a vice on the mill, arrange a stop point bar, arrange a lever on the bar itself so your fingers go nowhere near the cutting area and pivot it around the pivot by hand advancing it into a milling cutter to round the ends. Takes longer to think about it than do it, great technique. I've done loads of tabs and rounded ends using the technique and I think its in tom lipton's book amongst other places.

  8. #828
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    29,007

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    Quote Originally Posted by DATo View Post
    ....

    Your photo caught my attention because while visiting another nephew's home (I got a lot of nephews) we saw a snake which looked exactly like the one in your photo and about as large crossing the street in front of his house. He lives in a very urban part of town though there are some woods close by. The damn thing appeared huge and I'm all but positive that it was a copperhead. The stupid idiot (and he can be a stupid idiot at times) went out to the street and kicked it a few times despite my frantic cautions. Son of a bitch got away with it. ....
    There are some non-venomous water snakes that look very similar in pattern, but do not have the same head. They will often try to strike, but can only do damage with their teeth.
    1601

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

  9. #829
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    USA MD 21030
    Posts
    4,522

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    Cambodian kids play with big snakes, and they also catch and eat them:

    https://www.facebook.com/81254409888...8122968328847/

  10. #830
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Barrington, NH
    Posts
    964

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    No pics, but I actually did something in the shop for the first time in I-can't-remember-how-long. I made a pair of replacement lower sections for my son's crutches. One of them broke while he was using them, and upon inspection the other one had started to fracture the same way (around where the tube is cross-drilled to accept the detent pins). So I ordered some thicker walled 3/4" diameter aluminum tubing to make replacements for both of them. Pretty simple, just bandsawing to length, cross drilling, deburring, then reassembling with hardware taken from the original parts.

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