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Thread: What did you do today?

  1. #1811
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    USA MD 21030
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    4,790

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    It's been a good car. I bought it in June 2008 for $4200, and it hasn't needed any major repairs. Prior to this, I had a 1998 SL1 and a 1997 SW1, both of which were totaled while parked in my driveway, so the drunks that did the damage paid me reasonably enough, especially since they had high mileage and were using oil. The plastic doors and panels are deceptive, not showing any sign of rust, while underneath, the frame is rotting to hell. I've had other vehicles with frame rot, but this is the first one that really showed symptoms of being a "clunker".

    Quick check on local Craig's List:

    https://baltimore.craigslist.org/cto...733800408.html (2004 Mercedes ML350 6 cyl auto 4WD 140k $3800)

    https://baltimore.craigslist.org/cto...722566012.html (2003 Honda Pilot auto 222k $3000)

    https://baltimore.craigslist.org/cto...743124468.html (2005 Honda Pilot auto 165k $3500)

    https://baltimore.craigslist.org/cto...731283310.html (2005 Honda Pilot auto 119k $4200)

    https://baltimore.craigslist.org/cto...734310566.html (2004 Honda Pilot auto trasmission leak 200k $1450)

    https://baltimore.craigslist.org/cto...728652238.html (2005 Honda Pilot auto 179k $2200)

    https://baltimore.craigslist.org/cto...738047606.html (2001 Hyundai Elantra GLS auto 79k $2600 Lutherville)

    https://baltimore.craigslist.org/cto...727013537.html (2007 Hyundai Santa Fe 3.3L V6 auto 68k $1400 Westminster)

    https://baltimore.craigslist.org/cto...743379555.html (2005 Toyota Prius auto 155k needs minor work $3500 Ellicott City)

    https://baltimore.craigslist.org/cto...737535216.html (2005 Toyota Prius auto 201k $2750 Fallston)

    Some interesting deals. Decisions....
    Last edited by PStechPaul; 11-07-2018 at 08:46 PM. Reason: links

  2. #1812
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Deep in the Heart of Texas!
    Posts
    7,710

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    Clunker? That's a death trap! That wouldn't pass a safety inspection down here. And now you've made it impossible to sell without serious legal culpability risks. Once on the interweb always on the interweb.

  3. #1813
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Kendal, On
    Posts
    1,290

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    To continue the rusty car theme in the oposite direction.....: )
    Did more work on the Heep frame tonight after work. Tacked the side panels together, then cleaned them all up to the same size. While they were still together I use them as a bending form to heat, and beat the top and bottom plates to shape.


    I can pull the rest of it together with clamps while welding it out.
    here's the peices all done and cleaned up ready for welding. Not shown are the fish plates for the sides.

    and mocked up with some spacer blocks inside to keep things square and spaced properly.

    I was going to weld them out at work tonight as we just got a new (to us) millermatic 250 and I've been itching to try it but I didn't bring my hood, and the gen pop one we have at work sucks really bad (because people are muppets and don't look after things).

    Lipstick on a pig you say? Not worth the effort? I agree on both counts. : )

  4. #1814
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    British Columbia
    Posts
    6,370

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    Pass a safety inspection? Heck I'm surprised it got passed a pothole in the road without loosing one of the rear axles.

    This is the trailing arm that locates the rear axle and suspension, the eye that holds the bushing to the mount has even opened up completely. Not that the trailing arm's mounting point to what is left of the frame is any less precarious.




    Your mechanic was right, it is time for another car. Not that you aren't aware of this.

    Unfortunately the salt has recruited another soldier off to the the dismantlers. Welding is not a viable option due to the extent of rust and components that will need to be replaced.It will take more in parts never mind labor than the car is worth.
    It's sad when this happens to a car that runs well, gets good mileage, and has a nice set of tires on it. Unfortunately it is worth more as parts than as a car.

    Move forward Paul and consider yourself lucky to having not been involved in a serious collision with the car. Had you not had it inspected this could have just as easily ended much worse.
    I always try to look at the things I can be thankful for, not at what I don't have at times like these.

    Sounds like you are already getting close to ending this chapter in your automotive career. Good luck with the new car!
    Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
    Bad Decisions Make Good Stories

  5. #1815
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    USA MD 21030
    Posts
    4,790

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    Yeah, it was just rather a sudden shock, but I also realize that I was quite lucky to have taken it in today. I had just assumed it was something simple, not a serious safety hazard. Too bad this one didn't get totaled by another speeding drunk like the other two.

    Actually, I've been lucky with safety issues on this car. A few years ago I suddenly lost the brakes when pulling out of a spot on a local parking lot. I was able to limp home and then to the the shop where my mechanic replaced a rusted brake line. A couple years later I had been driving up and down the mountains near Harper's Ferry, and then when I finally arrived at my campground, I lost brakes again, and a guy who lived there was able to replace another line that had rusted. In 2010 I had driven to an event on a Sunday 60 miles away in Harrisburg. When I tried to start the car to leave the battery was totally dead, and I had it towed to a local garage, who was luckily open, and he was able to replace the battery (for only like $100) so I could get home. Another time I was visiting a friend near Frederick, and as I was leaving, the gear shift mechanism broke and it was stuck in 2nd. I was able to limp about10 miles into town where I got a temporary repair at a tire place, and then a permanent (I thought) fix by my mechanic. But a year later as I was leaving his shop after an oil change, it happened again, and he was able to do a better fix. And another time I was heading to my machine shop class, and 1/2 mile down the road the car died. I had it towed to my mechanic's, where he had to replace the fuel pump.

    I'm now looking forward to getting another vehicle. I was pleasantly surprised to find the cars listed above for such good prices. But now I am torn between getting something like the Prius for fuel economy and "green" statement, but repairs might bean issue, especially battery replacement. Or a small car like the Hyundai. Or the Honda Pilot SUV. I think the Mercedes would be a lot more expensive to repair, but it's probably a high quality vehicle. And none of the vehicles has a manual transmission, which I prefer. I'll probably go back to the shop tomorrow and have a better look at his vehicles, and get his opinion on the other options I found.

  6. #1816
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    British Columbia
    Posts
    6,370

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    Dan, nice bit of fabrication on the Jeep snowplow frame. Not much time left till show, or should I say, snow time.
    Don't suppose you have the luxury of doing the actually assembly on the Jeep at work do you? Looks like you've got everything you need there, would make it so much easier and faster for you.


    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Dubeau View Post
    To continue the rusty car theme in the oposite direction.....: )
    Did more work on the Heep frame tonight after work. Tacked the side panels together, then cleaned them all up to the same size. While they were still together I use them as a bending form to heat, and beat the top and bottom plates to shape.


    I can pull the rest of it together with clamps while welding it out.
    here's the peices all done and cleaned up ready for welding. Not shown are the fish plates for the sides.

    and mocked up with some spacer blocks inside to keep things square and spaced properly.

    I was going to weld them out at work tonight as we just got a new (to us) millermatic 250 and I've been itching to try it but I didn't bring my hood, and the gen pop one we have at work sucks really bad (because people are muppets and don't look after things).

    Lipstick on a pig you say? Not worth the effort? I agree on both counts. : )
    Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
    Bad Decisions Make Good Stories

  7. #1817
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    NE Thailand
    Posts
    1,021

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cenedd View Post
    I think that R8 used to be difficult to get tooling for here and so 3MT was the defacto HSM standard. Now that's no longer the case and I think that R8 is perhaps superior. The issue with 3MT for a spindle is purely in getting the damn things back out again if you've tightened them enough to be sure they aren't going to slip on you. More of an issue with finger collets where to grip the tool more, you are tightening the drawbar and jamming the 3MT into the spindle. Must get round to making some risers so that's not so much of a requirement.....although that's bound to just lead to taller workpieces!

    Was jealous of the Kurts until I realised two things: the cost is definitely in divorce territory....and sticking one on my mill would most likely topple the mill! Definitely jealous of your 5" facemill. My machine's only rated for 35mm (1" 3/8) which hardly seems worth it!
    Check your spindle bore.
    Even a MT3 spindle should just need the drawbar nipping up with a spanner, no pulling on it with all your weight. A half turn nut loosen, and a slight wack with a brass hammer and the tooling should come free.
    Anything else and there is something amiss.
    My Tom Senior M1 runs a MT2 fer chrissakes in the quill feed vertical head, cutters never slip, and anything is removed easily as above.

  8. #1818
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Stevens Point, WI
    Posts
    7,597

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    Quote Originally Posted by PStechPaul View Post
    Today I stopped at my mechanic's shop to find out why I have been hearing a rattle and clunking sound from the rear end of my 1999 Saturn SL1. It's been getting worse, and I suspected maybe shocks or bushings or even a muffler clamp. Well, it was a shock, alright!



    He said, "You need a new car", and at first I thought he was kidding. But I'm surprised that I can even drive it. Actually, it's not really safe to drive, so I will have to use my 1989 Toyota pickup until I find something. He has several vehicles on his lot that are for sale. One is a 1998 or so Mercedes SUV that he would sell for $2500. There is also a 2005 or so Hyundai for $1500, but needs $1000 of work. And he also has a 2009 Honda Passport SUV in good shape that one of his customers wants him to fix up to sell. I'd prefer a small car with good fuel economy like my Saturn, which gets 35-45 MPG, but I don't really drive very much (maybe 5000 miles a year), so a 15 MPG increase would be only be about 58 gallons per year increase (based on 35and 20), or $174 per year. I will also check Craig's List and Facebook Marketplace to see what is out there and reasonable price estimates for these vehicles. I figure to spend up to $5000.

    So, more pictures:





    I should have taken pictures when the car was up on the lift, but I was still in shock and there was another vehicle coming in so I had to move mine out quickly. It probably could be welded, but there are other places with pretty severe rust, and this mess is next to the gas lines and tank. Maybe I can get $500 for the car as-is? It has only 110,000 miles and nearly new tires, doesn't use oil, and runs great. But since Saturn has shut down, parts are hard to get.


    My brothers chevy lumina did the same thing. It was a winter around town beater so we got new trailing arms off ebay for around $25 each. I pulled up the carpet in the back above where the bars mount, threw down a thick plate of steel, drilled the bolt holes threw the floor, and bolted threw the whole deal plate, floor, trailing arm. Lasted out the car for another 3 years.
    Andy

  9. #1819
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Finland
    Posts
    179

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    Painted some walls and ceiling white in the area the milling machine is to go. Not very pretty since I didn't mask anything off and I got shelves and stuff in there so I can't even paint it all. But I did it mainly for the light, everything is a lot brighter in there now when the walls aren't gyproc brown.

  10. #1820
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Kendal, On
    Posts
    1,290

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    Quote Originally Posted by Willy View Post
    Dan, nice bit of fabrication on the Jeep snowplow frame. Not much time left till show, or should I say, snow time.
    Don't suppose you have the luxury of doing the actually assembly on the Jeep at work do you? Looks like you've got everything you need there, would make it so much easier and faster for you.
    Thanks Willy. Supposed to snow this weekend.... The jeep will never leave the property unless going to the scrap yard, so all work ON it must be done at home, in the backyard. It's funny, but I'm actually much better equipped to do fab work at home than I am at work (work has me beat in the machining dept, but I'm slowly working on catching up). It's easier for me to do small stuff like this at work though, because I can work in the shop. At home it's working outside (welding/grinding) on a workmate in the driveway or backyard, under lights by the time I get home. It's just easier to stay at work for an extra hour or two. Plus when I get home from work, I spend time with the kids before I have to put them to bed, and by then I'm zonked, and don't feel like doing much of anything that resembles work. I'm totally at mercy of the weather on this project, and the only free day's I've had the past two weeks have been raining. Laying on my back on wet grass, cutting, grinding and welding isn't my idea of a good time lol. The clocks ticking though....

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