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Thread: What did you do today?

  1. #4011
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
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    Ontario, Canada
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    182

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    Quote Originally Posted by PStechPaul View Post
    The nail gun sped up the process considerably, but my OCD buddy still takes a looong time to lay a shingle:
    Ain't nobody got time for that! You'd get tossed off a roof for working that slow with the guys I know. You can go pick up shingles and fill the dumpster. I hope you're not paying by the hour...

  2. #4012
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
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    Ontario, Canada
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    182

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    Quote Originally Posted by mattthemuppet View Post
    looking good Tom, but don't forget that the tailstock needs to line up too. Is the countershaft pulley free to slide? Looks like a 3 step toothed pulley on the countershaft but only one pulley on the spindle.
    I have a riser block for the tailstock that should bring it back up to center. Yes, the countershaft is a bit odd - single pulley on the headstock, 3 sliding pulleys on the to match the headstock, and then a 4-step v-belt to the motor. Should give me 12 speeds by my figuring? Need to do some math yet to figure out what those 12 speeds are.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Fixit View Post
    Tom,

    With the simple ways that the bed has, maybe you could build riser blocks for the head and tailstock to meet the carriage crosside, and a given tool post.
    Just me thinking outside of the box again.

    TX
    Mr fixit for the family
    Chris
    That's a good thought. I'm thinking I might just get it up and running to make the parts I need, then assess what my next step is. Individual parts for the Ames lathes are available, but they are often beat up and cost a lot. Like an original cross slide missing a good chunk is going for $325 USD (plus the exchange to CAD and shipping....), it might be more worthwhile to keep this one tooled up for a couple specific jobs and start looking for a better equipped lathe for future jobs. This one will get me up and rolling, but might only carry me so far.

  3. #4013
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Location
    Loveland,CO
    Posts
    186

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom S View Post
    Ain't nobody got time for that! You'd get tossed off a roof for working that slow with the guys I know. You can go pick up shingles and fill the dumpster. I hope you're not paying by the hour...
    Buddies work for beer, ribs and the fact that you will help them when they need it. Employees work for money

  4. #4014
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    USA MD 21030
    Posts
    5,400

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    Quote Originally Posted by Corbettprime View Post
    Buddies work for beer, ribs and the fact that you will help them when they need it. Employees work for money
    Yes, he is taking way too long, and I am paying him $25/hour, but I can't do this work myself, and he is at least extra careful, rather than fast and sloppy. This project would have cost me about $5000 from a professional roofer, and I figure this will cost less than half that. He's not exactly a buddy - I just met him walking or biking down the road and he said he has done roofing work. He did the first roof repair for a flat rate of $1000, which was about 1/3 the estimate by a pro. I've had bad luck with other handyman types as well as contractors, and this guy (John) is honest and hard-working, although slow and overly meticulous.

    Anyway, today we finished the front shingles up to the outside wall of the house, where we were able to fit a 12 foot piece of flashing along the top course of shingles and under the wood siding - then used roofing cement to put another half-course of shingles up to the wall. It may not be perfect, but it should be fine and leak-proof.







    This was four hours of work. We might be able to finish this job tomorrow

  5. #4015
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    N.J.
    Posts
    1,631

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    For that small amount of roofing, nails and a hammer would be appropriate. NFW would I waste even $100 on a coil nail gun.
    I'm no professional roofer, but something just doesn't look right about the shingle layout.

  6. #4016
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
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    USA MD 21030
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    I agree that some areas of the layout look a bit odd, but I think they are just designed that way, to give a sort of random "wood shake" look:







    Close-up:


    Some of the shingles are cut so that there is a very thin shingle tab at the edge, and they are all different. At least four different shapes. No matter how I tried to align them, there were always odd-looking portions. It might look better if I trimmed the edges of the funky shingles, but that would be very time consuming and certainly would not be done by pros.





    As for using a hammer and individual nails - we started that way, and it took at least twice as long for John to do it that way. He insisted on choking the handle of the hammer almost to the head, and it took half a dozen (or more) blows for each nail. It took two hours to do just two courses, and there are 17 courses on each surface. Of course the ones on the side are smaller and the length decreases moving up. But I figure it would take about ten hours with a hammer, and four hours with the nail gun. So I spend $100 and save $150 in labor. And I will have more roofing jobs to do in the near future. No brainer...

    Yeah, most guys could go a lot faster than John, and I could do that as well - if I could work on the porch roof. But after four orthopedic surgeries my balance is shot and I can't kneel very well.

    [edit] Just took this quick video, showing that I can drive two roofing nails in less than 10 seconds:

    http://enginuitysystems.com/pix/hous...Nails_5449.AVI
    Last edited by PStechPaul; 06-15-2019 at 08:56 PM. Reason: video

  7. #4017
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Missouri
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    31,542

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    We have those "architectural" shingles, and there are no "runt tabs" that appear obvious to me. But the roof is two stories up, so..... They look good here.
    1601

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

  8. #4018
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Woodinville, WA
    Posts
    9,512

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    The exact course layout is usually on the pack or instructions. Tells you over 4 or more courses how many inches to cut of the starting run for each. Follow it and it works.

    I have a pro roofing coil nailer. Very useful for all sorts of things. You can rent them for $25 a day around here, plus nails.

  9. #4019
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    USA MD 21030
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    5,400

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    Here are the instructions, but since this is a hip roof, there is no need to cut the shingles as shown for the rake (or gable) edge.



    There is also no instruction for coordinating the pattern of the shingles with those that are adjacent or above or below.

    We did make a mistake about nailing the shingles. There is a red line just above the tabs, where the shingle is thicker, and it results in each shingle having two rows of nails when the next course is installed.


  10. #4020
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Posts
    371

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    My latest project on video https://youtu.be/P3YqUCgKLtA


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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