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Thread: What did you do today?

  1. #4341
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Finland
    Posts
    389

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    For a small piece like that I would probably hand plane it, too dangerous to run through the table saw or planer (jointer). Though the sides could be squared up on a sled or a slider table on the table saw.

    I made dust collector ports today for my not yet finished DC system, 160mm ports, the odd one will go on the filter box because of space concerns, otherwise the design of the sliding portion is like that since it "self cleans" from debris.






  2. #4342
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    So. East Idaho
    Posts
    574

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    Very nice work! Great job too.

  3. #4343
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    USA MD 21030
    Posts
    5,468

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    My good friend Gordon, who just turned 88 in May, died unexpectedly but peacefully on Monday. He was an extreme hoarder, and when some of his family and I went into his small apartment Wednesday and Thursday to clean it out, I was able to acquire most of his numerous tools. They were actually only a small fraction of what he had left at his previous residence, and prior to that, apparently he had one or two houses jam packed with various items. Here is a Dewalt power screwdriver that he had purchased at a yard sale for $5. Three of the four batteries took a charge:



    Some odds and ends. He also bought the Forstner bits at the yard sale, for $10. The screws on the belt are rather strange, with a special sort of offset square drive:


    Hammers, pipe wrenches, and pliers:


    Ryobi "Tough Sucker" and other stuff:


    Dewalt reciprocating saw, Craftsman circular saw and sander:


    More assorted stuff:


    Nice pouch of drills and c/sink:


    Tool box with some nice tools in the top tray:


    And other things in the bottom:


    I can understand accumulating lots of tools, but he also had huge quantities of food items, such as possibly 50 jars of peanut butter, 25 bottles of liquor and wine, hundreds of cans of beans, tuna fish, soup, vegetables, and other such. Also a dozen 5 pound blocks of Velveeta type cheese, all sorts of chocolates, a 2 year old unopened Christmas package with a dried up fruit cake, maybe 100 cellophane wrapped chocolate chip cookies of unknown vintage, dozens of small containers of milk and fruit juice, etc. Much of that had to be thrown out. The family members tackled the piles and boxes full of old newspapers and junk mail mixed in with bank statements, bills, and other important papers. I'm certainly a pack rat, but Gordon was actually diagnosed with "hoarding disorder". I have other friends who are similarly afflicted to various degrees.

    I'll miss my old friend Gordon, but he lived a long and very interesting life, and I'm glad to have been a part of it over the last 15 or so years I have known him.

  4. #4344
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    3,755

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    Quote Originally Posted by PStechPaul View Post
    My good friend Gordon, who just turned 88 in May, died unexpectedly but peacefully on Monday. He was an extreme hoarder, and when some of his family and I went into his small apartment Wednesday and Thursday to clean it out, I was able to acquire most of his numerous tools. They were actually only a small fraction of what he had left at his previous residence, and prior to that, apparently he had one or two houses jam packed with various items. Here is a Dewalt power screwdriver that he had purchased at a yard sale for $5. Three of the four batteries took a charge:



    Some odds and ends. He also bought the Forstner bits at the yard sale, for $10. The screws on the belt are rather strange, with a special sort of offset square drive:


    Hammers, pipe wrenches, and pliers:


    Ryobi "Tough Sucker" and other stuff:


    Dewalt reciprocating saw, Craftsman circular saw and sander:


    More assorted stuff:


    Nice pouch of drills and c/sink:


    Tool box with some nice tools in the top tray:


    And other things in the bottom:


    I can understand accumulating lots of tools, but he also had huge quantities of food items, such as possibly 50 jars of peanut butter, 25 bottles of liquor and wine, hundreds of cans of beans, tuna fish, soup, vegetables, and other such. Also a dozen 5 pound blocks of Velveeta type cheese, all sorts of chocolates, a 2 year old unopened Christmas package with a dried up fruit cake, maybe 100 cellophane wrapped chocolate chip cookies of unknown vintage, dozens of small containers of milk and fruit juice, etc. Much of that had to be thrown out. The family members tackled the piles and boxes full of old newspapers and junk mail mixed in with bank statements, bills, and other important papers. I'm certainly a pack rat, but Gordon was actually diagnosed with "hoarding disorder". I have other friends who are similarly afflicted to various degrees.

    I'll miss my old friend Gordon, but he lived a long and very interesting life, and I'm glad to have been a part of it over the last 15 or so years I have known him.
    At 88 years old, he was a very young kid during the great depression. I don't blame anyone for hoarding stuff that were exposed to those times.

    Sent from my SM-G950U1 using Tapatalk

  5. #4345
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Posts
    388

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    Quote Originally Posted by PStechPaul View Post
    My good friend Gordon, who just turned 88 in May, died unexpectedly ...
    His landlord is VERY grateful!

  6. #4346
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Posts
    384

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    Finished my salvage project. Was working on a parting tool holder that used HSS blades, but as usual I couldn’t get them to work, so I modified the holder to use the holder for GTN 3 blades. This ended up working well.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

  7. #4347
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    USA MD 21030
    Posts
    5,468

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    This evening I finally finished cleaning up most of the slash from the tree limbs that came down in a storm a couple weeks ago. By the time I was ready to take pictures the light was fading and my hands were not very steady after using the chainsaw (although it is much smoother than a gas powered saw):





    I might need to nudge some of the big rocks on the edge of the ditch to the culvert, enough that my truck can fit between that and the trees.


    I was able to get a clearer picture using the flash, showing the huge pile of smaller branches and leaves that I piled up. I was able to break most of the smaller branches off by hand. I used the chainsaw for anything much bigger than my thumb (rule of thumb?)

  8. #4348
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Portland Oregon
    Posts
    764

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    Paul,

    Looks like you need to build a chipper to grind that stuff! Good job on tackling that big mess.

    TX
    Mr fixit for the family
    Chris

  9. #4349
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    San Antonio TX, USA
    Posts
    2,711

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    nice work Paul, that'll keep you fit! I remember you saying that your electric chainsaw cut out in the middle of a previous use, but the battery wasn't empty. Almost certainly it was the thermal protection on the battery kicking in to protect the Li-ion cells. I've had that happen a few times with my electric lawnmower when the grass was high and it was hot out. Now I stick the batteries in the fridge the night before - stops them overheating plus cuts down on the cool down time before they start charging again.

    I've been working on a new poly-v spindle sheave for my lathe so I can get rid of the V-belt. Done all the internal features and fitted the bearings, now I need to make an arbor so I can finish the external features (poly-v grooves, gear mount).

  10. #4350
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    USA MD 21030
    Posts
    5,468

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    You're probably right about the thermal protection. It was over 90F when I had the problem, usually after a relatively long and heavy cut. Yesterday it was more like 85F and I was taking short, light cuts of 2"-5" branches. No problem, and battery still 75%. Here are better pictures taken today:



    My "upside down" tree - just a leafy hanger - not quite a widow maker:


    This is the dead tree that was mostly responsible for the carnage:


    Looking down to the culvert from the access road:


    Future firewood:


    I will probably need to cut that big limb to get enough clearance for my truck:


    I might be able to drive over the upper part of the gully where it is not so deep, and the rip-rap is a bit smaller. Hard to see here:


    Yeah, that was a lot of work for my 70 year old bones and muscles. I do have a "Roto-Hoe" chipper/shredder I bought over a year ago, but I started taking it apart and never had the time or energy (or necessity) to get it running. Not sure how well it would work.

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