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Thread: Shop Layouts...What Is Yours Like?

  1. #1
    Too_Many_Tools Guest

    Default Shop Layouts...What Is Yours Like?

    I am interested in how others have their shops laid out in respect to machines, storage, traffic flow...and what works and what does not.

    So let's hear and see how your shop works for...and not against you.

    TMT

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    204

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    One thing I did that a realy like is positioned the lathe so that when running it I can look out over the rest of the shop. It's parallel to the wall and about 5 feet out from it. At the tail stock end of the lathe is a wall that stores tool holders and lathe accessories. Against the wall is a a bench with tool box, storage cabinet for taps/dies, reams, brouches My surface plate is also on top of the bench. Under the bench is storage for metal.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Prince George BC
    Posts
    196

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    I put wheels on everything but the big lathe and the mill. lol!

    edit: But I have had the skates under them a few times too.....

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Posts
    3,092

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    The machine room of the shop is long and thin- essentially a shed/room along one wall of the main shop.

    Consequently, I can't have machines "out", everything has to be placed along the walls. Worse, all four walls have a door or entryway, eating up some of even that limited space.

    I added machines piecemeal, over a decade (though the bulk of them within the last three years) and never really planned any layouts. Machines basically just landed wherever there was room.

    I have eleven machines in there now (including a small desktop drill press and the little die filer) and need to find space for at least one more, possibly as many as three (if I include the Baldor carbide grinder on it's stand.)

    I've been meaning to do the paper-cutout-and-graph-paper thing to see if I couldn't make things a bit more compact. Grizzly's application doesn't have horizontal mills, 16" shapers or brake lathes.

    I also regret not sealing or even epoxy-painting the floor first, so maybe I should kill a summer moving machines in, out and around...

    Doc.
    Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Montezuma, IA
    Posts
    978

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    As you walk in from the office area, there's a built-in bench to the right with a barrel vise and arbor press. Along the rh wall is a window with air conditioner, past that is a cart with mill tooling. In the corner, at 45* is the 10-54" Enco mill. Back wall has the rpc and a workbench. Left side wall has my 12x24" Rockwell lathe and the door into the garage. To the left of the office door is my main workbench (2'x8') and tool boxes. Two vises on that bench, a Parrot vise and an older machinist's bench vise. In the center of the room is a worktable with cleaning & solvent equipment, a roll around cabinet with another tool box and a floor mounted drill press. This is in a shop about 280 sq. ft. Good thing it's just me in there!

    David
    David Kaiser
    Montezuma, IA

  6. #6
    gary350 Guest

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    One thing I have never liked working in other shops is having to walk 5 miles every day inside the shop. I positioned my equipment so I can stand in the center and turn 90 degrees to the next machine. I have a work bench the full length of the wall. I can make a 90 deg turn and there is the lathe. It is 4 ft from the work bend and about 2 ft from the other wall. Make a 90 deg turn and there is another work bench. Make a 90 degree turn there is the mill. The lathe and mill face each other and are about 6 ft between them. It sure does make is convient I don't have to walk much at all. My surface grinder is on the back side of the mill. It seldom gets used so its not a big deal to walk behind the mill to use the grinder. I have a belt sander and bench grinder on the work bench next to the equipment. I bought 6 kennedy 8 and 9 drawer tool boxes they are on top of the work bench filled with drills, taps, lathe tools, mics, calibers, dial indicators, all my tools. Make a 180 deg turn the other work bench is for assembly, parts I am milling, parts I am working on in the lathe, pencil, bad, calculator, etc. I have 2 moveable lights on swivel arms that I can move into position each side of my mill vise 100 watts each. On the other side of the work bench is an open area for large item I may be working on or building. Plenty of room to pull in a car, truck, trailer, etc. The welder and air compressor is on the other side of that. 2 walls in the shop have double and triple shelves and there is a shelf under the wall work bench.
    Last edited by gary350; 03-15-2010 at 08:03 PM.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Ontario
    Posts
    1,001

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    As one saunters in, the lighting comes up and plays over the epoxy coated concrete floor. Most of the lathes are on the right, mills to the left(no POS Bridgy yet), and through the firedoor straight ahead, grinding equipment.

    The staff is off today so the lunchroom is silent, but Guido has come in anyway to work on one of the Ferraris which I allow him to race.

    I frown at the swarf he has left behind on one of the larger Myfords. Good grief man! Does one always have to make such a mess?

    Sorry, no pics. The photographer is off 'til Wednesday.
    Mike

    My Dad always said, "If you want people to do things for you on the farm, you have to buy a machine they can sit on that does most of the work."

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    N. California
    Posts
    726

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    With all these questions you've been posting, you must be writing a book!

    My shop is in a 12 X 22 foot garage bay. It contains a full complement of both woodworking and metal working tools. As the same with many others, everything is on wheels except for the lathe and mill. Larger tools on wheels are assigned a priority, depending on frequency of use. Also considered are size, ventilation, unique physical properties with regard to space requirements, service intervals and difficulty/safety of movement. Some tools are stored are stored three deep, requiring two other tools to be moved to access them; i.e.: my wood lathe is behind my jointer, which is behind the wood bandsaw. I have a good size driveway and like to do my woodworking outside if possible.

    I keep my center space open allowing a minimum of steps to access what I need. There are two power winches overhead, one over the center of the shop for general hoisting and one over the mill table to hoist the rotary table (which is kept on a dolly in dead space) as well as my large differential head (stored the same as the rotary table). Small hand power tools and accessories are kept in file cabinets adjacent to the workbench. Primary use tools (wrenches, sockets, screwdrivers, etc.) are in a stacked toolbox on the other side of the workbench near the roll up door. This makes my primary hand tools readily accessible to my interior work area, as well as for outside projects. Another tool chest holds all my machinist items.

    Air is remote controlled from the workbench using a timer (so I don't hear the compressor firing up at 2 A.M.) and plumbed throughout the shop. Power is 20A, 120v and 220V outlets alternating every two feet of distance along the walls. A 60A 220V outlet for welding/plasma cutting is near the roll up door, as is a sub panel controlling all power in the shop. Next to the panel is a fire extinguisher and an internal doorway to the rest of the garage (the excess overflow area!!!!) The shop is also equipped with a stereo radio/CD, cable TV and Internet (Cat 5), as well as lots of lighting.

    Years ago, some now former co-workes gave me a Tim Allen 'Tool Time' hammer as a practical joke (did they know me, or what?!). Several years later, after completing construction of my shop, I affixed the hammer over the entryway of the shop, where it's on prominent display.

    Fred

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Live Oak, TEXAS
    Posts
    1,550

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    '
    I have the lathe's headstock angled towards the garage door in case I need to turn some long barstock.

  10. #10
    Too_Many_Tools Guest

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pherdie
    With all these questions you've been posting, you must be writing a book!

    Fred
    LOL..nope just nursing a nasty cold.

    The upside is recovery gives one plenty of time to surf the Web.

    TMT

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