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Thread: quick change tool post and holders

  1. #1

    Default quick change tool post and holders

    A recent article how to make a quick change holder attracted my attention. I've never owned or seen such a device but seemed worthwhile. It appears that the only function of this tool is to set the height of the cutting tool from one holder to the next. There seems to be considerable amount of materials and labor involved to make a set. Are there other designs that are simpler and less labor intensive beside the lantern style post? Thanks Paul

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2009
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    Canada
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    Commercially, Aloris and Dorian make tool posts with dovetails on two
    or more sides to accept holders where tools for turning/facing, boring,
    knurling & ect are mounted. Numerous clones of these two designs
    are available in the market - PhaseII & ect.

    Another style of tool post is the DA Swiss Multifix or it clones known
    generically as 40 Position Tool Holders.

    .

  3. #3
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    The idea of the quick change tool post (QCTP) is exactly as the name implies. A good unit will allow you to quickly change tools as you change operations or need to replace an insert in a holder.

    Basically you take a tool, whether an HSS bit, carbide with insert, boring bar, cutoff blade etc. Put it in a holder. place holder in machine, set height. Lock the height adjustment. Now, every time you use that tool it will be exactly where you left it set.

    Need to swap out an insert? No worry. Remove the holder, swap insert, put back in the lathe. It will be exactly where you set it previously.

    If you've ever used a lantern style or turret type tool post you'll see just how much time is saved with a QCTP. A godsend.

    Most QCTP setups require only the rotation of a handle to either (or both) swap a tool holder or reposition the post. Again, big time savers.

    Cheers!
    Mike N

    Occasional maker of swarf.

  4. #4
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    I read just the other day, that a fellow made one and cost him $60. He then found out he could have bought a set for $100. So unless you want to do it as a project to learn you may be better off buying one. The tool holders can be had for between $8-$12, you couldn't buy the steel for that unless you can get it for free.
    Here is one a freind of mine made, it's called a Groz style.
    http://www.woodworkforums.com/f65/gr...gether-104891/
    Dave

  5. #5
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    Dec 2008
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    Davo...

    That's a nice looking job he's done. Thanks for the link.

    I'm working on a smaller version of Andy Lofquist's MLA-23 QCTP.

    Not terribly expensive to buy materials to make this post. My shop is still crated up from my recent move. I really need to get busy and set the mill and lathe up.
    Mike N

    Occasional maker of swarf.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
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    I like a tool post style resembling a simplified version of this one http://steammachine.com/hercus/page6.html., http://members.optusnet.com.au/clear...s/article1.jpg , and http://members.optusnet.com.au/clear...s/article2.jpg . If you keep it simple, these are very practical and as only two critical dimensions need to be met, post OD and block ID, they are very easy to make. If you use HSS be sure to throw in 8-10 degrees or so of back rake into the tool blocks. I have been using this style of tool post for a couple of years now and they have performed perfectly. So, super easy to make and no mill is needed, rock solid performance, great part visibility, quick tool changes and I really like the ability to swing the tool to any angle I want. I made a set for a 10-inch Atlas that I got for the kids, but after testing it on my old 14 inch Monarch, it also got a post. I now share the blocks between the lathes.
    I would suggest that you make your first block so that it will accept your Armstrong type holders and then add to your collection.
    I have been told that if you use a 1.125” post, the system should be compatible with the commercial products available, Goggle Omni Post.
    Mike
    Last edited by mf205i; 03-18-2010 at 06:14 AM.

  7. #7
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    NSW Australia
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    Mike,
    It's looks pretty much the same but has the dovetails reversed, that push out instead of pulling in. You will have to post yours up when your finished.
    Davo

  8. #8
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    Dec 2005
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    Sarasota Fl.
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    I bought an Aloris setup about 35 years ago, it wasnít cheap even back then, but itís probably the best investment Iíve ever made.
    Tim

  9. #9
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    Missouri
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    Quote Originally Posted by spinrow
    A recent article how to make a quick change holder attracted my attention. I've never owned or seen such a device but seemed worthwhile. It appears that the only function of this tool is to set the height of the cutting tool from one holder to the next. There seems to be considerable amount of materials and labor involved to make a set. 9b0Are there other designs that are simpler and less labor intensive beside the lantern style post?[/b] Thanks Paul
    Pay me now, or pay me later.......

    Spend a fussy amount of time adjusting and re-adjusting the lantern post EVERY time you use it, OR spend a fussy amount of time making a post etc ONCE, and be able to rapidly use it, and rapidly set it to work wit, with different tools later, (or of course, spend your 'time" by paying for one).

    You can also make a simple 4 sided tool post, with different sides having the correct slot for your favorite sizes of cutter, and set height-wise to put the top of the tool on-center. Then your tool grind needs to always put the edge at the top, but you can swap tools at will.

    Not nearly as fast as the QCTP, but very effective, and uses just ONE lump of steel instead of at least a half dozen.

    The QCTP, which I keep thinking about obtaining one of, is better for repeatability. But it does not seem to be without problems. I find the "preset" type of 4 way to be able to be adjusted very quickly to many settings, and the QCTP has not become a priority yet.

    if you are using the lantern post, ouch... The first thing I did with my fisrt small lathe (a 109, of course) was to make it a block tool post.... The lantern post is best suited to a bygone slow era... It's plain ugly and outmoded, although it can be useful about once every 10 years.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
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    I built my own going off pictures on the internet. Done entirely on the atlas lathe minus the bandsaw cuts.

    Not only is it nice to change out cutters but it is also much much more rigid than the lantern post.





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