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Thread: Soldering On a Bolt Handle

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
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    Default Soldering On a Bolt Handle

    Most people say to silver solder a bolt handle on (except the ones that TIG them). Looking in Brownells, the have Silvaloy Silver Solder and they have the Hi Force 44, which has silver in it too.

    The Hi Force has a lower temp requirement which I like, to keep the temp of the bolt down at the cocking ramp, but is it strong enough? What is the strength difference between the two?

    I have the torch to do both.

  2. #2
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    I have been looking at doing this too. I have Mauser 98 action that I will have to modify the bolt handle on. The general consensus is that TIG, followed by A/O welding, then silver solder are the best options. I don't think a soft solder will provide the strength.

    I was talking with a fellow at a show last weekend who made up a fitting with the bolt sleeve thread on it and an adapter that he connected a mist coolant unit to. He used a water mist to keep the cocking ramp cool enough.

    I will probably forge the bolt handle on my action, but will use this method when I do.
    Jim H.

  3. #3
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    Dec 2007
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    None of the soft solders (silver/tin) are going to be strong enough in the long run. The first sticky case (over pressure or dirty chamber) you get will allow you to rip the bolt handle off of the bolt body. Remington silver brazes their bolt handles onto the bolt bodies, but the surface area is pretty huge compared to Mausers or Springfields. Easiest to do is tig on a new handle, less cleanup. Hardest to learn is to forge a handle.

    David
    David Kaiser
    Montezuma, IA

  4. #4

    Default

    A Mauser doesn't have enough surface area for soldering, It will need to be welded

  5. #5
    Join Date
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    Ashland City, TN
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rws
    Most people say to silver solder a bolt handle on (except the ones that TIG them). Looking in Brownells, the have Silvaloy Silver Solder and they have the Hi Force 44, which has silver in it too.

    The Hi Force has a lower temp requirement which I like, to keep the temp of the bolt down at the cocking ramp, but is it strong enough? What is the strength difference between the two?

    I have the torch to do both.

    Use an A/O torch and a 3.5% Nickel Steel rod. Use a "heat sink" bolt inside the bolt body and keep the lugs wrapped with well wetted rags. Roy Dunlap's book can guide you through it step by step.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
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    9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Al Messer
    Use an A/O torch and a 3.5% Nickel Steel rod. Use a "heat sink" bolt inside the bolt body and keep the lugs wrapped with well wetted rags. Roy Dunlap's book can guide you through it step by step.
    I second this. I have done this with a Mosin Nagant. Luckily the bolt head can be removed so you don't need to worry about to much heat getting to the locking lugs ( that's where you need to be carefully about the heat not at the caming angle.) After I milled off the bead you couldn't tell it was welded.

    You get the high nickel rod from Brownells. Doing a bolt handle on a Mauser is made a lot easier using the jig Brownells has.


    Sorry for the slightly out of focus image. The camera is supposed to auto focus but it doesn't seem to do that well on closeups.

  7. #7
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    The strength of any solder job, silver or lead, depends on how the parts are fitted together.

  8. #8
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    Nov 2003
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    I think there is a difference between welding a bolt handle, such as converting a Mauser handle, and attaching a Remington handle to the bolt body.

    There are many different types/strengths of silver solder, I assume by the silver content. Here is where my original question was meant. The High Force 44 is one type, and there is the Silvaloy which I think has a higher silver content.

    I can send the bolt out and have it TIG'd. I can't heat the bajjebers out of it and use the silvaloy. Or I can use less heat and use the High Force 44. My question is will the HF 44 hold? I'm not in the habit of loading to the point of having to stand up to force a bolt open.

    I have tried to twist a copper pipe joint apart that was soldered with plain 50/50, and the pipe would twist and fail before the joint did.

  9. #9
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    David is the voice of experience. Any of the low melting point solders will not have enough strength for an adequate job. It might hold up for a while, but the potential for failure will always be there.
    Jim H.

  10. #10

    Default Silver "bearing" solder and silver braze

    There seems to be some confusion as to these two separate processes. Silver soldering is a soldering process that joins the metals at lower temps with a silver colored soldering metal Like hi-force 440. Silver brazing is the way you want to go if you cant TIG them or gas weld. There was supposed to be an several part article on gas welding in the mag that I have been waiting to come out, but until then you can silver braze the bolt handle and it will have plenty of strength. This is the slightly brassy colored rod or wire that melts around 1200 deg. and will require a heat sink or paste in the bolt threads. Don,t fit them frog hair tight, there needs to be a little room between the parts for the silver braze to wick into. I usually cut the bolt handle off square and mill the 90 deg. cut into the new handle @ about a 30 deg. angle, center punch the mating area so there is room for the braze and jig them up with a simple L shaped frame I made from aluminum. This works perfectly if your not going to try to reblue the bolt handle. The braze will take some color but be visible, If your going to Dura-Coat it will be invisible.

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