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Thread: Deburring Gas Port Holes

  1. #1
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    Default Deburring Gas Port Holes

    I've found it necessary to enlarge the gas port holes in a Remington 1100 barrel. My question to you, my astute colleagues, is how would I deburr the port holes inside the barrel? Right off, I am thinking a brake hone or even some 600grit sandpaper on a rod, spun by a drill. Any thoughts?
    Sometimes the professional is hidebound by tradition while the skilled amateur, not knowing it can't be done blazes a new trail. -JCHannum

  2. #2
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    See pages 240-248, you will find something that will work.
    http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INPDFF?PMPAGE=240&PMCTLG=00

  3. #3
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    Thanks Ron, but I saw nothing there that would help me to deburr a hole inside the barrel.

    What about something like this:

    http://www.mytoolstore.com/kd/kdbrak08.html

    What do real gunsmiths use?
    Last edited by Kibby; 03-30-2010 at 06:35 PM.
    Sometimes the professional is hidebound by tradition while the skilled amateur, not knowing it can't be done blazes a new trail. -JCHannum

  4. #4
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    I asked that same question on "the other site". Some good info.

    http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb...-ports-169891/

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kibby
    Thanks Ron, but I saw nothing there that would help me to deburr a hole inside the barrel.

    What about something like this:

    http://www.mytoolstore.com/kd/kdbrak08.html

    What do real gunsmiths use?
    Kibby,
    I own and have built integrally suppressed 10/22’s. Those require porting the barrel, and I have done a number of them. One of the class III weapons builders I used before I began building my own, turned me on to the Cogsdill Burraway tool here: http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INSRIT?P...PMAKA=619-1310
    It can be obtained in different sizes to suit your needs, and can be seen on page 248 of the link I posted. If the tool bottoms out, the end can actually be trimmed back so it will go deeper in a blind hole. But many of the de-burring tools listed in the link I gave you will do the inside of a hole a lot cheaper than the Cogsdill.

    There are some professional builders of AR-15’s that post on the gunsmithing forum at BenchrestCentral.com. If you posted your question there, maybe one of them will tell you what they use.

    One of the things I learned about drilling a port is that you should drill it in 3-4 steps to minimize the burrs. The final size should only be about .002”-.003” larger than the step before it. That way practically no burr will be there to deal with.

    I hope this helps.

  6. #6
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    How does that burraway tool work, Ron? Does that triangular end rotate? I guess I am not picturing it.

    Also, if I drill the gas ports in small steps, could I simply use a reamer for the last step? Perhaps the secret is in using sharp drills and then a nice sharp reamer at the end?
    Sometimes the professional is hidebound by tradition while the skilled amateur, not knowing it can't be done blazes a new trail. -JCHannum

  7. #7
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    Holy cow! I just went to the Cogsdill site and saw a video of how that worked. I think that's do the trick, but how will I get my shiny finish back inside the bore? Is a shiny finish necessary inside a shotgun barrel? All I will ever use in this particular gun is 00 if that makes any difference.
    Sometimes the professional is hidebound by tradition while the skilled amateur, not knowing it can't be done blazes a new trail. -JCHannum

  8. #8
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    The blade in the Cogsdill tool is spring loaded, but can be locked in place after it expands on the inside of the hole. You twist the tool back and forth to de-burr, and then unlock the blade so it will fold back inside the holder for removal. It is depicted in the link I posted.

    Drilling is small steps with sharp drill bits helps a lot, and a reamer on the final pass would be fine.

    I wouldn’t worry about a shinny finish or using 00 buckshot. All the shotgun shells I shoot have the shot enclosed in a plastic sleeve. I don’t think lead touches the sides of the barrel anymore.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kibby
    Holy cow! I just went to the Cogsdill site and saw a video of how that worked. I think that's do the trick, but how will I get my shiny finish back inside the bore? Is a shiny finish necessary inside a shotgun barrel? All I will ever use in this particular gun is 00 if that makes any difference.
    Just to be clear.....
    You do realize that Ron is talking about inserting this tool through the PORTS and not down the muzzle of the barrel right?

    It sound like you are talking about honing out the bore, which would remove the choke (unless cyl. bore) from your barrel. Not sure you guys are on the same page here.

  10. #10
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    Low Price: $47.98 ea

    Cogsdill tools were nearly free when there was a Boeing surplus store

    I am getting ready to drill a gas hole myself.
    The rifling makes the de burring tool problematic.

    http://www.benchrest.com/forums/showthread.php?t=66814

    I am going to drill undersize and then ream the hole to .093".
    http://www1.mscdirect.com/CGI/NNSRIT...MT4NO=82792361

    I always liked reamed holes better than drilled holes; rounder, smoother, more precise diameter.
    There is nothing noble in being superior to your fellow man; true nobility is being superior to your former self. -Ernest Hemingway
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