Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12

Thread: Noobish question: Best way to find the center of bar stock

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Tipp City, Ohio
    Posts
    1,732

    Default Noobish question: Best way to find the center of bar stock

    And I mean the ends...

    I Googled it, seen all kinds of methods..Just looking for a simple tool or method that is idiot friendly and doesnt require a lathe..

  2. #2

    Default

    Most people would use a centre finder such as this... http://www.rhrtools.co.uk/shop/image..._finder1_c.jpg

    Which reminds me, I must buy one.

    Chris.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Oroville, WA
    Posts
    10,760

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Western New York U.$.A
    Posts
    7,266

    Default

    This is as good away as any.



    I use the thing on the left of this next picture. You make an X using the center find attachment and where the lines cross is the center. Do this line with a sharp scribe and your center punch can be felt to fall into the groove made by the scribe.

    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
    Thank you to our families of soldiers, many of whom have given so much more then the rest of us for the Freedom we enjoy.

    It is true, there is nothing free about freedom, don't be so quick to give it away.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Tipp City, Ohio
    Posts
    1,732

    Default

    Yes, that little one looks about perfect... now where to buy?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    870

    Default Center Head

    Check with almost any old machinist as they will have one or two extra heads in their collection and very seldom used. All it takes is to find a blade that fits.

    JRW

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Ashburton, near Christchurch New Zealand
    Posts
    5,006

    Default

    None of those instruments will find the centre unless they are accurate. If in doubt scribe three lines with the tool at about 120 degree angles. If they all cross at the same point the device is accurate, if you get a small triangle scribed the centre is in the middle of the triangle.

    Even though the instrument may be accurate the end result depends on skill with the scriber.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Toledo, Ohio
    Posts
    9,069

    Default

    Get thee a height gage with scriber or hermaphrodite caliper and learn their many uses. Finding center of round, square, rectangular ao hex stock is but one.

    The older shop texts, How To Run a Lathe, the Atlas Lathe book, and older Starrett catalogs demonstrate uses of the various tools.
    Jim H.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    jefferson,georgia
    Posts
    105

    Default how exact?

    I'll probably take some grief for this,but how exact a center (or centre) are you hunting? I've learned (alot of it from this forum) that an exact center for a fabricator and a center for a watchmaker are to VERY different points.The instruments shown in the other posts are more than accurate enough for the fab stuff I do,even taking into consideration failing eyesight. However,they may not produce the results needed for someone re-manning a a turbo,so I guess its a question of of thousandths or tens?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Green Bay, WI
    Posts
    2,534

    Default

    The simplest tool is a center punch that comes out of a funnel.
    You stick the concave funnel shape onto the end of a round shaft and hit the punch, and its done. I don't have a photo to show you

    When not using the Lathe for such an assignment, and location is not super critical, I lay the round down on the workbench and place a tool bit about half the diameter on the bench at the end of the shaft.
    roll the round back and forth, and using a felt tip maker on top of the tool bit, I draw a series of horizontal lines OR if the felt tip is large, just hold it near the center of the round.
    The felt tip will actually be slightly above C/L
    When you remove the round , you have a nice shiney spot exactly in the middle of the round. This can be a very accurate measure, when you use a spring punch on the shinney part before center punching

    Rich

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •