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Thread: Syncrowave 200 TIG

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
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    Missouri, USA
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    Smile Syncrowave 200 TIG

    OK gents.... I just ordered a new Syncrowave 200. Any tips on using this particular machine, ie. any common quirks, or tendency's and things to avoid doing?

    I know - it's not the greatest choice among the pro's, but I'm a newbie to TIG and had a limited budget. Also having given away my old Lincoln farm unit AC buzz box (HUGE), I find myself missing having the stick capability. The oxy/acetylene and MIG are great, but itching to get into some TIG now. Thanks.

  2. #2

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    I run a Syncrowave 300 all day long, good solid machine.

    The only suggestion I have is with your torch replace the collet body with a gas lens and sharpen your tungsten in the direction of the length don't grind around the tungsten if that makes sense to you making the point 2-3 times as long as the diameter of the tungsten, and the finer the finish on the grind the better(mirror is optimum but not always possible by home shop means)

    after that its all practice, practice, practice...

    you will need to use 2% thoriated(RED) tungsten for DC and pure(GREEN) for AC. When you are using the pure tungsten dont sharpen the it will form a ball on the end by itself and if the tungsten seems like it is burning back into the torch you will need to turn your "Balance" down to get more heat into the work and not the torch...

    hope this helped,
    Ed
    Last edited by EdC; 05-13-2010 at 07:41 PM.
    Experience is something you don't get until just after you need it. ..

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2009
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    I run 2% thoriated with a sharp point all the time on AC with aluminum using my sync250dx. After a while it'll crack and spawl, but generally I stab the filler into it before that happens (necessitating grinding).

    Second thing after a gas lens is getting a water cooled torch. Especially running AC, the torch gets hot. I've melted the collet body into a 17 torch (I think that's what the 200 comes with right?) using 160A AC and 50% balance. It's simply not up to the task.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
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    West Michigan
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    Highpower,

    I don't think you have given up stick welding at all.

    I have a synchrowave 180 and have the stinger for stick welding.

    I also have the Miller suitcase mig welding outfit and the Miller spool gun for welding aluminum. Haven't tried the spoolgun yet though.

    With the right variety of gasses, you should be able to weld most anything within the thickness limitations of a 200 amp welder.

    Brian
    OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS, OPEN MIND

    THINK HARDER

    BETTER TO HAVE TOOLS YOU DON'T NEED THAN TO NEED TOOLS YOU DON'T HAVE

    MY NAME IS BRIAN AND I AM A TOOLOHOLIC

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Beaverton, OR
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    Default

    The 200 is a nice little machine. You can get large air cooled torches but they get pretty bulky.

    Totally different from a 300 though. Cant even compare them, several generations apart.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Missouri, USA
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    Default

    Thanks for the input guys. The 200 isn't in the same class as the 250's and 300'rds, so I don't think I will have to worry about burning anything up. Both the machine and the torch are only rated at 150 amps, which will be enough for my hobby uses. I've got a Millermatic 185 MIG and have never needed to push it's capabilities with my meager needs - so I think the 200 will be plenty good enough for me.

    My comment about loosing the stick capability was because I used to have a Lincoln stick welder, but it went away. That is why I chose the 200 over something like a Diversion 180 - to get the stick option back.

    I thought the trend was to use Ceriated over Thoriated these days?
    Since this is a old-school square wave machine, do I still need to use pure tungsten for AC and Thoriated for the rest? Again, I've never struck a TIG arc in my life - so I have to ask....

    BTW, the machine is scheduled to be delivered today. Naturally. Thunderstorms all day.......

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2009
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    Minneapolis, MN
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    Default

    I didn't burn up the 17 on the sync250, it has a built in cooler - I did it on the tigmate/econotig: the machine below yours.

    Building a watercooler is child's play. Once you go to a 20 torch, you'll wonder why you didn't do it sooner.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
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    Missouri, USA
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    Well...... no joy. And no welder.
    Turns out the city had put up a new "NO TRUCKS" sign at the end of my street. And the freight driver refused to drive the 100 yards to get to my house.

    Looks like I'll be having a chat with the boys at the welding supply on Monday. I just can't win.......

  9. #9
    gnm109 Guest

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    Sorry about your missed delivery. I'm sure you'll get your machine.

    I have a Syncrowave 200 and it's an excellent machine. It's got all of the bells and whistles you will need.

    I do think you may wish to convert to a liquid-cooled torch, however. I had a liquid-cooled torch on my former Lincoln 250 Idealarc. I tried the air-cooled torch on the Miller and it works, but it's not much fun.

    It's not real easy to convert the Miller to liquid-cooling since you will be needing something like a QW5GT double bypass. The hoses are a pain to deal with. The 200 has no water solenoid so you can't use it on a sink without adding one, either. With a water circulator or a Miller, Lincoln or Bernard cooler you can just have it start when the machine is running and no solenoid is needed.

    I use a water circulator. Once you get all of your hoses set up, you will love the liquid-cooled torch. With liquid-cooling, you will be able to do up to 1/4" material with ease. I run mine on a 50 amp dedicated line and it's more than enough.

    Here's mine when I was setting up the liquid-cooled torch. The unit to the left is a homemade water circulator and the one on the far left is an old Bernard that I restored. Both use a Procon pump that moves something like a gallon per minute. Miller makes a cooler that is more compact but mine was rather inexpensive.



    Here's a closeup of the holes. There is a feed, return and gas line all on the one unit. For stick welding, that unscrews and the stinger goes in instead.



    Here's the Procon and motor underway. It is set for close to 60 psi and does a wonderful job of keeping the torch cool. You can weld as long as you want to with this setup. If you look closely, you can see that I have a visible return so that I can see that the pump is working properly with a quick glance.

    I use about 5 gallons of Miller mix in the tank to cool, althuugh I sometimes cut that with distilled water. I've also used soluble oil and tap water, car coolant and straight distilled. Battles have been fought on the internet as to which cooling medium is best. I haven't yet used maple syrup, however. It's all good.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
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    Missouri, USA
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    Default

    Thanks for posting the pics of your setup. Quite impressive! After seeing your rig and the discussions about the air cooled torch being lacking, it makes more sense to me now. Why in the world do they give you a 150A torch for a machine with a 200A output anyway?

    I'll have to look into the water cooled goodies -- assuming Miller can find a driver to actually DELIVER my machine.

    To be continued.......

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