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Thread: Looking for reamer source...

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Twisp, WA
    Posts
    108

    Default Looking for reamer source...

    I'm into air rifles, nice ones, that's the primary reason I got a lathe. Recently, on one of my air gun forums, someone suggested creating an integral muzzle brake by boring out the muzzle end of the barrel larger than bore diameter. For the project rifle I'm working on, I like this idea. And if it turns out I don't like it in reality, I can always cut off the brake end and turn a brake I do like.

    However, that brings up the question of how best to bore the end of the barrel. It was suggested that a piloted reamer would be the way to go, to maintain concentricity with the barrel bore. The concern is, wiping out the rifling with the pilot. Has anyone here tried something like this, and if so, how did you go about it? By all accounts, the steel used in air rifle barrels is quite a bit softer than firearms, so anything with a tool steel pilot will risk destroying the rifling. Is it possible to get a custom reamer made with a brass pilot, or is the pilot just not needed in this case? My intent is a 4-6" brake section, with an actual (rifled) barrel length of around 12", optimum for spring piston air rifles. Any suggestions or ideas would be much appreciated, thanks.

    Dave

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    13

    Default

    you can buy counterbores with replaceable pilots held in with a set screw. maybe make your own pilot out of brass?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Montezuma, IA
    Posts
    944

    Default

    41mag, you beat me to it! You can get removable pilot counterbores on EvilBay in the range of $15-$20. Look for aircraft counterbores, with a reduced diameter shank that you can solder to an extension...

    David
    David Kaiser
    Montezuma, IA

  4. #4

    Default

    On some piloted reamers for chambering rifle barrels the pilot is made to rotate so it does not wear the rifling in front of the chamber. The pilot spins on the screw that holds the pilot onto the reamer. You cold make one that does that.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Arkadelphia Ar.
    Posts
    444

    Default

    Try contacting PTG. They can probably make any live piloted reamer you want.
    http://www.pacifictoolandgauge.com/

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Demokratik Republik of Washington
    Posts
    255

    Default

    Hmmm. Interesting curiosity. If the material for the pilot is soft, I would think it could catch and gall the rifling. In short you would have a reverse reamer.

    I would go with a hardened tool steel pilot. That way it could not gall and if it was polished very smooth (8 or better finish) I don't see how it could damage the rifling. I might even make the pilot extra long to engage as many lands as possible to spread out any pressure you might have.

    But that is just me.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Northern Neck Virginia
    Posts
    496

    Default

    You are describing a live pilot and that's what you are going to want to use. Be very sure the nose of the pilot is stoned smooth and well rounded, if not it can dig into the rifling and gouge as its inserted.

    How do you plan on deburing the the rifeling crown 4"-6" down inside the barrel? A pointed brass rod with lapping compound will work for this.


    I've never done this on anything other than in high volume production on large caliber handguns but you might be able to make a drill rod guide that would be a slip fit in the barrel, install it from the chamber end. It would have a slip fit hole that fits the reduced shank of reamer with a live pilot. Remove the pilot from the reamer and use the guide tube as the pilot. We use this to eliminate the posability of the live pilot picking up a chip between the pilot and the reamer, getting stuck and start spinning on the rifing.
    Ignorance is curable through education.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Bellingham WA
    Posts
    315

    Default

    I second QuadRod's suggestion

    Contact Pacific tool and Gauge in Oregon.

    Ask to talk to Dave Kiff. He is my contact there and is a true professional in his line of work. He will make you what ever tooling you could ever need. Something simple like you need would probably run you $100 +/_.

    They make nothing but top shelf tooling in my opinion. Very high quality and long lasting.

    Cheers
    Mac.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    855

    Default

    I don't get it. What's the point of a muzzle brake on an airgun? Best way would be to chuck the barrel in a lathe and go to it.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN
    Posts
    1,139

    Default

    I don't understand why you want such a long section of unsupported flight inside the barrel?

    A brake is intended to divert the gasses away from the projectile so that any movement of the gun after the bullet has cleared the muzzle won't throw the tail off and effect the bullets stability and thus trajectory.

    With a spring air gun, the only effect the modification you propose has is in reducing the report. Having a chamber even half an inch deep will likely result in the effect you're after, and you can easily do this with a boring bar.

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