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Thread: Compressed Air Powered Fan

  1. #1
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    Default Compressed Air Powered Fan

    ...does anyone sell a complete unit? Something that fits in a duct. I have an idea that would require a fan. Due to limitations in the electricity supply at the intended location I need an alternate energy supply. There is plenty of compressed air though.

    More or less it is a vent hood over a rubber mold at a friend's shop. Going to set it up on a trip-switch so the mold opens the fan comes on and sucks the peroxide fumes up. Then a timer kicks the valve shut so there is no draft over his hot mold.

    The rubber is a thermoset EPDM material, it is injected "cold" into a "hot" mold where it cures. When the mold is opened a huge cloud of peroxide fume and rubber smoke flows forth. Can't suck too much air over the mold because it throws off the thermal balance.

    His shop... less than ideal. It would be a hardship to run another 120v line at this point, but he does have more compressed air than he possibly needs.
    This product has been determined by the state of California to cause permanent irreversible death. This statement may or may not be recognized as valid by all states.
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  2. #2
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    Default

    Just blow the air down the duct.

  3. #3
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    What about converting a simple air tool to drive the fan? A die grinder would be my choice, and for a couple of reasons- it already has an output shaft on bearings, and a way to mount the fan. The fan needs a 1/4 inch diameter stub, that's pretty much it. Second reason- the fan would load the die grinder down so much that its air consumption would be drastically lower than it would be in its intended use.

    You would probably just wire the trigger bar down to the body and run it using an inline air valve on the line somewhere. Using a typical quick disconnect, you would have a place to occasionally drip some air tool oil.

    You could set it up such than the air valve is opened to some degree when the mold lid is opened.
    Last edited by darryl; 06-17-2010 at 11:26 PM.

  4. #4
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    No need for a fan. If you have compressed air, fix a jet in the center of the duct to blow the air out. This action will cause a vacuum behind the jet and draw air into the duct from the other end. It's the same principle used in the air powered vacuum "pumps".

  5. #5
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by lakeside53
    Just blow the air down the duct.
    +1,just turn a 90* elbow into the center of the duct and add a 8-10" long nipple.Works just like a locomotive stack blower-


    http://www.trainweb.org/tusp/sergio/..._stack_f_2.jpg
    I just need one more tool,just one!

  6. #6
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    Default

    There is a whole science to ejector design. Large, perchloric acid fume hoods use ejectors instead of an in-line fan. Why not use a small muffin fan powered from a battery pack? . Even a fairly large one only draws a few watts and it IS intermittent duty. A 12v fan and a hefty gel battery should work a treat and it has the benefit of microswitch control. I assume this thing only has to run a dayat a time, then recharge the battery.

  7. #7
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    Not sure how much flow you're going to need to extract the fumage, but it will probably be pretty significant- I'm thinking more than a few muffin fans could handle. Also, I do have a cupple problems- do you not have light there? And is there not a need for SOME electricity in that whole process? And how is the air compressed without electricity?

    I might be inclined to go along with the battery and 12v fan idea. You could always set up a solar charger to keep the battery up, and maybe use a heater blower motor to remove the fumes.

    It is beginning to sound like there's a lack of willingness to bring electricity to the area, though it really should be done for the sake of the project-

  8. #8
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    The lack of electricity has more to do with the absolutely decrepit building that houses his shop and the unwillingness of the land-lord to allow anyone to run additional lines from the breaker system downstairs. It's one of those "business incubator" deals where you rent a bay, start your business and then move out once you are underway.

    With all the stuff he has to run as secondary equipment off of the existing lines, tripped breakers are a daily event for him.

    Compressed air, however... is supplied from three big rotary compressors down in the basement and a smaller secondary Tractor Supply upright compressor in his shop. Air is virtually free.

    Thanks for the "stack blower" tip, that'll reduce the number of moving parts. I have extensive notes from my material loader design session more than likely I can scale that up.
    This product has been determined by the state of California to cause permanent irreversible death. This statement may or may not be recognized as valid by all states.
    Heirs of an old war/that's what we've become Inheriting troubles I'm mentally numb
    Plastic Operators Dot Com

  9. #9
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    Jan 2010
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    What about the NOISE of a high pressure jet of air in a metal duct?

    If breakers are tripping daily then he as more issues than airflow.

    I would demand my 'bay' be up to code... threaten a complaint. This guy has little chance of making it in the business world if he can't get electricity right, or negotiate/pay for proper facilities.
    Last edited by Farbmeister; 06-18-2010 at 06:52 AM.

  10. #10
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    Jan 2007
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    Coppus Air Blowers make several different types of air powered fans. They are intended for flammable atmospheres and other specialty situations so hold onto your wallet. They may give you an idea of what you can do though.

    Take a look at, http://www.directindustry.com/prod/d...98-350531.html

    P/R

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