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Thread: how to repair a firing pin

  1. #1
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    Default how to repair a firing pin

    I know nothing of gunsmithing. That said can anyone tell me how to repair a broken firing pin? I have an old 22 JC Higgins model 30 I used as a kid and would like to give it to my Grandson. Problem is the firing pin is broken off. It's only .094 dia and something broke it in the past. Will brazing or soldering hold on such a small diameter peice or should I try to turn a new one? I've checked the parts sources and can't find a new one. Could I turn a new one out of drill rod and harden it? I can't afford to spend a lot on it but would really like to see him shooting it.

  2. #2
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    Hi dont61760
    Could you post a picture? I don't think brazing or soldering would be a reliable fix. Making one from drill rod and tempering it would probably be the best bet.

    Terry

  3. #3
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    Apr 2008
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    Dry firing (empty chamber) is probably what broke the original pin.

    If it is the correct length, it probably doesn't even need to be hardened if you make it out of drill rod, with the possible exception of the sear notch.

    The only job it has is to crush the brass .22 rim fast enough to set off the cartridge. Not much resistance to the impact by steel on a .22 brass case. I would turn a new one... try it, and see if it starts to mushroom after a couple of boxes... it would probably take thousands of rounds to make it do so... if it ever will.

  4. #4
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  5. #5
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    make it from O1 and oil quench and temper. Draw it back at as hot as your home oven will get.

    Set your firing pin protusion to a max of .042" and it should not contact the breech face. (but measure to be sure and make the firing pin a couple thousanths shorter than the head space dim.)
    Last edited by Rusty Marlin; 07-27-2010 at 03:16 PM.
    Ignorance is curable through education.

  6. #6
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    Also make sure it's rounded nicely and polished, as an improper shape can pierce the brass.

  7. #7
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    Default MidwayUSA

    Do a search on utube for MidwayUSA, Larry Potterfield made a good video on how to make one. Jan

  8. #8
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    If it is simple to turn a new one, make it out of drill rod, harden it and draw back to blue (spring).
    If it would be a pain to replicate, make a replacement tip only, same as above materials and 2.5 times longer than needed, grind the old pin down to flush, and drill a snug hole at least as deep as your projected new tip will be centered on the old pin location, silver solder the new tip into the old drilled out body, grind to length (being sure to "hemisphere" the final end, no sharp edges). I love this way, it's simple and seams to last quite well, I haven't got one back yet.. (knock on wood)
    "Those who hammer their guns into plows will plow for those who do not."~ Thomas Jefferson

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by dont61760
    I have an old 22 JC Higgins model 30 I used as a kid and would like to give it to my Grandson.
    The J.C. Higgins brand was made for Sears by other gun manufacturers so by looking at the original makers guns, you may find a firing pin. I have looked in my gun smithing cross reference books and can not find a J.C. Higgins Model 30. There is Model 20 and Model 36 but no Model 30. Do you have the correct information?
    Bill

    Being ROAD KILL on the Information Super Highway and Electrically Challenged really SUCKS!!

    Every problem can be solved through the proper application of explosives, duct tape, teflon, WD-40, or any combo of the aforementioned items.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by smiller6912
    If it is simple to turn a new one, make it out of drill rod, harden it and draw back to blue (spring).
    If it would be a pain to replicate, make a replacement tip only, same as above materials and 2.5 times longer than needed, grind the old pin down to flush, and drill a snug hole at least as deep as your projected new tip will be centered on the old pin location, silver solder the new tip into the old drilled out body, grind to length (being sure to "hemisphere" the final end, no sharp edges). I love this way, it's simple and seams to last quite well, I haven't got one back yet.. (knock on wood)


    This is the way I would do it. Same method I use to replace pivots in gear arbors.

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