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Thread: OT: BATTERY GAME CHANGER, Dramatic breakthrough

  1. #1
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    Default OT: BATTERY GAME CHANGER, Dramatic breakthrough

    If true there is a new battery technology that has the clear potential to change the world almost overnight.

    New Battery Technology makes lithium-ion batteries last 20 years
    By admin, February 4, 2010 9:11 pm
    Japanese Eamex researchers have discovered a technique that could dramatically extend the lifespan of lithium-ion batteries. The new approach keeps the tin inside the battery intact for much longer despite the strain caused by charging and recharging. By absorbing much of the stress through a new alloy in the tin-coated resin, the tin and the electrode structure are more stable and could last for as long as 20 years.

    The figure is based on an assumption of about 10,000 complete recharges, or about 10 times more use many batteries today, including those for notebooks. Apple estimates that a MacBook or MacBook Pro battery can withstand about 1,000 cycles over about 5 years of constant use. Regular notebook batteries are estimated to last about 300 cycles.

    Eamex plans to ship a battery with about 10,000W of power per kilogram (4,545W per pound) by the end of 2010 and expects the most use to come for vehicles like electric cars and scooters, where the need for a long-lasting battery is the most important. Such technology can scale down to smaller devices, however, and should be useful for storing energy from a home’s solar power and could reach portable devices like notebooks.

    http://www.batterycentury.com/news/2...last-20-years/
    Do you know how often we hear about promising new battery technologies every year? Over 4 million times. That's what it feels like, anyway, even if we're way off in our estimation. But here's another number: One. That's how many battery breakthroughs we expect to materialize in an actual product in 2010.

    The technology we're referring to comes from a Japanese company called Eamex, who says it has discovered a way to increase the life of high-capacity lithium-ion batteries. We tend to give this one a bit more credibility, if only because Eamex isn't talking about a theoretical tech that could eventually lead to the demise of lithium-ion.

    What Eamex has done is figure out a way to stabilize the electrodes and prevent the deterioration of tin. Why's this important? Because it means the batteries can withstand a lot more charge and discharge cycles. We're talking about over 10,000 cycles with a shelf life of 20 years. By comparison, Apple says a MacBook or MacBook Pro battery can withstand about 1,000 cycles over about 5 years of constant use.

    Unlike other battery technologies, you don't have to wait a decade for this one to come to market. Eamex says it will ship a battery with about 10,000W of power per kilogram (suitable for electric cars and scooters) by the end of 2010.

    http://www.maximumpc.com/article/new..._electric_cars
    This is incredible even if they don't completely meet the claims. 10,000 watts per kilo is double the energy density of gasoline per pound. 10,000 full charges means that for most products batteries will never need to be replaced. Virtually any device that now requires a cord to operate becomes a viable cordless tool or appliance. It will even make portable electric heaters practical.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Evan
    It will even make portable electric heaters practical.
    Not sure which is more impressive, the battery breakthrough, or your (almost) fantastic prediction!
    Allan

  3. #3
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    This is way cool and should make all electric cars & light trucks quite viable.

    thanks for the info which I'll also use for my Intro to Tech class.

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    Why is it that the claim "10,000W of power per kilogram" seems like the wrong unit of measure?

    A capacitor will provide a huge number of watts, but for a fraction of a second. I wonder what the kwH will be?

    Important measures of a battery are how much energy it will store (kilo-watt hours), how fast it will provide that energy (watts), the number of charge cycles it can stand, how fast it self discharges and how long it will last without being used.

    Last year the same company announced a capacitor providing "600Wh/L". That was announced last June. The caveat was that the capacitor they could actually produce was extremely small.

    I'd love to see some gadgets based on some of these claims reach the market.

    Dan

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    Batteries will only get smaller, not more powerful. At least for consumer applications. Think of the lithium D cells. Break them open to find a AA cell, some plastic and a lot of air. A genuine lithium D cell has enough energy density to be hazardous if shorted or damaged. Think of flaming Sonys - and they had the equivalent of a pack of AA cells.

    Still, with a corresponding breakthrough in battery armor and safety circuits...
    Weston Bye - Author, The Mechatronist column, Digital Machinist magazine
    ~Practitioner of the Electromechanical Arts~

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    Armour isn't the answer. What is needed is some sort of safety mechanism that responds to either temperature or current over time and when the limit is exceeded it releases a chemical that poisons the reaction. This need to be an integral part of the battery makeup so that it cannot be removed. Otherwise a truly high capacity battery becomes a bomb.
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    Quote Originally Posted by danlb
    Why is it that the claim "10,000W of power per kilogram" seems like the wrong unit of measure?
    Good point. Gasoline has an energy content of about 20,000 Btu/lb, which is 13 KW-hr/kg.

    We need to know what the energy density of the breakthrough battery is.
    Allan

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    I wonder what the efficiency penalty is for reconstituting the tin during charge. Life time and capacity of a 10,000 kw battery won't mean squat if it takes 20,000 kw to charge it.

    The other problem is the batteries need to be ready to go each circadian cycle. Or at least support a weekly commute with weekend full charge event.

    There's a potentially sinister side to electric cars - much like siphoning off gas, tapping into somebody's power outlet to get a quick freebie is going to happen unless it is made very difficult to use power from a common outlet.

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    So they're claiming a revolutionary tenfold increase in battery life as well as a huge increase in specific power? *AND* it's going to ship by the end of the year? Sounds great, if true. But color me skeptical.
    Todd

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    I wonder why this isn't a huge main-stream news story.

    Phil

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