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Thread: Checkering on metal

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
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    2,107

    Default Checkering on metal

    I need to checker a small area on the hammer of my High wall project and can't seem to get it right. Years ago I used the Dem-Bart checkering tools on wood with great results and I was wondering if there is a similar tool for metal, I have tried several different types of files and even made some guides to keep the lines straight but somehow it just not look exactly right. Any suggestions?

  2. #2

    Default

    I think Brownells sells metal checkering files. I have also seen this done with the part set up in the milling machine.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Burnet, TX
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    Default Metal Checkering

    I have seen references to grinding some of the flutes off a thread tap and using that to make a styrated type grove in the mill. I have intended to try that but never got around to it. It could be done with a 45 Dovetail cutter on small parts with a little creative fixturing. I am kind of old school and use my files a lot but don't think that I would enjoy doing that the hard way.
    Byron Boucher
    Burnet, TX

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
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    216

    Default

    Those 8 in 1 files that you use to clean up damaged threads are great for checkering and adding serrations to small parts.
    Mike

  5. #5
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    Sep 2008
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    Default

    The thread files at Brownells look to be really nice but at $56 to $79 a pop for a 6" file it is a bit spendy for just this one job, I am sure they are worth it but I am not sure I would ever need it again. The modified thread tap sounds really interesting , I will do a search and see if I can turn up some how-to info on that and maybe do a test piece.

    Mf205, The thread restorer files sound like they might work along the same principle as the checkering files but are they sharp enough to cut new grooves? The ones I have seen, even new ones, are actually kind of dull compared to a regular file, is there a particular brand that works best?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Oak Ridge Tenessee
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    Default Knurl

    I have had luck doing this with a knurling tool. Make a fixture to hold the knurling tool on the head of your mill, use the mill knee to apply pressure to the work and crank your table back and forth under the rolls of the knurling tool.Of course you will be limited to larger work areas but it works ok for some aplications.

  7. #7

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    I have done some checkering by setting up the part on the mill and using a single point tool kind of like a shaper. The mill let me space the lines and I just went deep enough so a triangle file would follow the lines. The hard part was the setup so the angles were right. After you scratch in the lines you can take it to the bench and deepen them with a file to get the points.

    matt

  8. #8
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    Jul 2005
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    Burnet, TX
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    Default Thread Restorer Files

    I have used many of these. Quality ranges from very good to junk. The ones that we had that were darker in color allmost like Carbide were the best. Of course they were not carbide but they cut very much like a regular file does. The kind of silvery ones were junk. I think we got the good ones from an independant Auto parts store. There are some triangular files that are not tapered that seem to work much better than the tapered ones.
    Byron Boucher
    Burnet, TX

  9. #9
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    Sep 2008
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    Default

    I looked on E-bay and the thread files are available in just about every brand including Snap-On. This part would be hard to do on a mill because it is the thumb spur on a hammer and it is not only slightly rounded but the checkering will be over a slight compound curve.


    Actually the more I think about it and considering the time I have invested in this thing maybe those files from Brownells would not be a bad investment afterall.
    Last edited by radkins; 01-12-2011 at 09:40 PM.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
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    Ashland City, TN
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    2,295

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by radkins
    I looked on E-bay and the thread files are available in just about every brand including Snap-On. This part would be hard to do on a mill because it is the thumb spur on a hammer and it is not only slightly rounded but the checkering will be over a slight compound curve.


    Actually the more I think about it and considering the time I have invested in this thing maybe those files from Brownells would not be a bad investment afterall.

    Try a thread file on a piece of scrap first, then if that file does not cut cleanly, invest in a file from Brownells.
    Last edited by Al Messer; 01-13-2011 at 10:26 AM.

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