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Thread: Stamping brass caps

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
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    157

    Default Stamping brass caps

    I'd like to stamp out some pipe caps from .030 cartridge brass. The caps will be used as cylinder head covers for a steam engine. I've made a stamping assembly that fits in the press. I need to anneal the sheet before I do the actual pressing correct? Wasn't really too sure on this since I've never actually tried it.

    Ken

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
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    Toledo, Ohio
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    Heat to red hot and allow to cool or quench in water. Depending on how deep the draw is, you might need to anneal more than once.
    Jim H.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
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    Default

    Yeah, that's why I posted. Once in it's in the jig, there is no going back for a 2nd annealingl. It's pushed through in one motion. The brass is forced through an aluminum plate that takes into account the thickness of the sheet.

    Ken

  4. #4
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    Dec 2007
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    Rough and ready; dim the lights, heat to dull red, slow air cool, not too slow as the graind get so big that it renders the brass weak and brittle, sudden quench hardens it.
    Cold working then hardens it again, you may need a lubricant when deep drawing, from memory it used to be Aquadag, colloidial suspension of graphite [with a bit of acidity to keep it from clumping up] in water, it used to be available in areosol cans but that was 30 years ago! [i cant remember what happened yesterday!]
    mark

  5. #5
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    Jan 2010
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    Default Draw Die Lube

    Mix some Lanolin with Alcohol, or use commercial case lube for resizing brass cartridges. The aluminum die may not last very long, don't know how many you're wanting to make.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
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    Southwestern Ontario, Canada
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    Don't forget, annealing works best if the primers are removed first.

    Pictures please.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
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    Albuquerque, New Mexico USA
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by boslab
    Rough and ready; dim the lights, heat to dull red, slow air cool, not too slow as the graind get so big that it renders the brass weak and brittle, sudden quench hardens it.
    Brass is not hardened in a quench. The common way to anneal brass cartridge cases is to stand them up to their neck in a pan of water, heat the neck to low red and tip them over into the pan.

    I like to quench brass because it helps blow any oxide off before I put it into the pickle. Saves work.

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