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Thread: Finally made a real part in the CNC mill !!!!!

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Columbus Texas
    Posts
    674

    Default Finally made a real part in the CNC mill !!!!!

    We finally got around to making a ( what I consider ) real part. It's a timing cover plate for the Ford pulling tractor. There is a lot of stuff to buy or make. When you start off in the CNC machinist realm. I still consider my self a beginner and need to make a lot of fixtures. I can see down the road that we will have tons of fixtures and one off doodads. The chuck is barrowed off a indexer and we made the back plate. The finish is good but not perfect. Still need some more practice with Bob Cam. I thought it was going to make a finish pass on the pocket and it did. But just on the side wall. The recommend speeds are to slow for the cutters also. That will be a some thing I have to work out. The top of the cover was the same bad finish (speeds to slow). We reran the final pass and bumped the speed to 4000 rpm and .0125 cut. The face mill produced good finish. Just need to play with it some more and maybe we can get the lines out. I used peck milling to do the roughing.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Fairport NY
    Posts
    2,579

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    Better that I can do!
    This product has been determined by the state of California to cause permanent irreversible death. This statement may or may not be recognized as valid by all states.
    Heirs of an old war/that's what we've become Inheriting troubles I'm mentally numb
    Plastic Operators Dot Com

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    804

    Default

    That looks about normal, if you go to Cimco http://www.cimco.com/download.php3 and down load the free feed and speed calculator life with the CNC will be much more rewarding. Chip loading is the key parameter along with sfm are the best way to go. In 6061 alum. with a 4 flute 3/8" carbide usually gives a low Ra finish around 3300 rpm, but, alot depends on your set up and length sticking out the nose of the holder. Niagra Cutter has extremely good data on depth of cut relative to cutter diameter, and their "starting point" is pretty close for the average VMC running on linear bearings.
    Last edited by squirrel; 02-01-2011 at 09:26 PM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Clinton, WA
    Posts
    955

    Default

    jeremy13,
    What machine are you using? what kind of spindle RPM does it have?
    Mark Hockett

  5. #5
    gary350 Guest

    Default

    I wish I had a small user friendly CNC mill. I have about 100 parts to make all are identical.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Columbus Texas
    Posts
    674

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    It's A Haas TM1P 6000rpm spindle. Used a 3 flute TIN rougher, 2 flute TIN finish and Glacern 2 1/2" 5 cuter face mill.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Clinton, WA
    Posts
    955

    Default

    You should be running all EM's under about 5/8" at 6000 RPM in aluminum, just adjust the feed rate for the recommended chip load. The face mill should also be run at 6000 RPM and 70 to 100 IPM. On my Fadal I run a 3.5" face mill at 7500 RPM and 120 IPM in aluminum. I sold a TM-1 to Harold V over on the Chaski board. It had a 6000 RPM spindle too, almost always ran at 6000 RPM.

    Also loose the Tin coated EM's they are not good in aluminum. 3 flute is good for roughing and some finishing operations. 4 flute is good for finishing with a fairly light cut, .010" to .020". Always climb cut. EM's will last way longer on your CNC mill then a manual mill so spend the money for good ones.
    Mark Hockett

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Alberta, Canada
    Posts
    68

    Default

    Wow! Fantastic looking work Jeremy13. If that's you're first I can hardly wait to see your 50th. Keep it going!

    Gord

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