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Thread: How would you...

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
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    Tipp City, Ohio
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    Default How would you...

    Put slits on the end of studs? stud diameters are .500 and .750..Length vary, shortest being 2.5" long up to 5.50" long...

    Slit dimensions are expected to be .125 wide by .25 deep.. maybe slightly different, but not majorly so...

    quantity is 130ish

    horizontal miller?

  2. #2

    Default

    One way would be to set up a fixture or vee block on your mill for the stud to sit in and use a slitting saw to cut the slit. With the block anchored you remove the clamp holding the stud and replace, do all the .50" first, adjust height and do the .75" dia ones.

    In this case length should not be an issue as you hang out over the vee block a little more than you want to go deep with the slit.

    DonT

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
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    If you have a 5C collet block, the fixturing would be a lot simpler-no clamping of the stud,just clamp the block in your vise.
    Duffy, Gatineau, Quebec

  4. #4
    Join Date
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    Toronto
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    Default

    imo nothing heavy duty about it that would require the cutter to be supported on both sides as with the horizontal mill and using the horizontal would require you to hold the stud vertically; much easier to hold it horizontally. I'd just load in the vertical mill's vise sitting on a parallel and cut the slot in one pass with a 1/8" horizontal style cutter like this http://www.thurstonmfg.com/images/plainmetal.jpg (not sure if at 1/8 they're still called slitting saws!) held on a R8 arbor or whatever you have.
    Last edited by Mcgyver; 02-02-2011 at 12:22 PM.
    .

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
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    Kansas City area
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    Default Slot

    I would just use a 1/8" wide woodruff key cutter in a 1/2" collet.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
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    Default

    This brings up a 2nd question..

    Material is ASTM 193 B16...which is Chromium-molybdenum-vanadium with a max hardness of 321 HB or 35 HRC

    Carbide tipped?

    http://www.mcmaster.com/#milling-cutters/=auyqas
    Last edited by cuemaker; 02-02-2011 at 12:27 PM.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Canada, Bc
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    7,595

    Default

    Last time I held 1/4" threaded rod in a 5C collet block, It had to be so tight to keep it from sliping it totaly ruined the threads.

    You might be better off drilling and threading a hole into some 1"x1"x1" stock and sliting it in half to hold the block. You can use the vise itself to clamp the block, or maybe holddowns or somesuch. Im not sure you can put more then 2 bolts into a single split block and have them all held securely.. You could have more then one split in the block however. but that seems messy to set up.

    Im also kinda leaning towards a sliting saw in a vertical mill, as otherwise you need to space the block off the table for clearance for longer bolts.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Banbury England
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    382

    Default

    Drill and tap square block.
    Screw stud in 1/2" longer than needed.
    Put nut on and do up tight.
    Put in vice and machine rotate machine etc.

    Steve Larner

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Long Beach
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    372

    Default

    I would thread a block and use a jamb nut (or wing nut) to secure the stud in the block for fixturing.

    I would also probably try and freehand it with a die grinder and a cut off wheel. It'll cut that tool steel no problem, tooling is cheap, and your cut is so small that it may be faster than cranking the handles and making multiple passes. I assume this is just an installation aid for the studs...someplace to stick a screwdriver, so it doesn't have to be perfect.

    When I had a piece of junk mini mill that I didn't really care about.... I put an abrasive cut off wheel on an arbor and ran it in the mill...cut lots faster than a slitting saw and was almost idiot proof as far as feeds and speeds go..

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
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    Kent, U.K.
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    Clamp two pieces of ally stock together with a shim between them, drill a handful of half-inch through holes along the line and tap for the stud thread. Load the bottom block into mill vice, load up your studs with a stop to align the and g-clamp the top half on top. Threads will stop the studs from slipping and you can cut them 5 at a time. When you've done with the 1/2" re-drill for the larger ones and repeat.
    Peter - novice home machinist, modern motorcycle enthusiast.

    Denford Viceroy 280 Synchro (11 x 24)
    Herbert 0V adapted to R8 by 'Sir John'.
    Monarch 10EE 1942

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