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Thread: Wheel Lug stud Installation?

  1. #21
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    A properly torqued lug nut is not going to come off. A dry nut will give a less accurate torque than one that is lubed, due to friction where the nut contacts the wheel. A little lube reduces this friction and helps ensure accurate torque readings ON THE THREADS.

    It is a standard accepted procedure to lube nuts, bolts, and threads before torquing, whether it be on the inside of an 8 cylinder engine, wheel lug, or a multi-million dollar industrial machine.
    Last edited by Iraiam; 03-07-2011 at 10:47 AM.

  2. #22
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    It is perfectly ok to lube the threads on wheel studs. While it does make the torque higher with the same torque wrench setting than a dry thread it will not cause the nut to come loose or damage the nut or thread in any way.

    Those that really torque lug nuts are in the minority so the reason they come loose is probably because they weren't tight in the first place.

    The advantage is the nuts do not rust to the stud and are easier to remove when you need to change the tire.

    There are many bolts in vehicles that are lubed when installed and they don't come loose because of the oil so why does anyone thing the lug nuts will come loose because of being lubed with oil or anti seize. It just won't happen.
    Last edited by Carld; 03-07-2011 at 10:24 AM.
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  3. #23
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    A friend of mine runs a garage. He's good at his profession, too, one of the very best. He ALWAYS lubes wheel studs whenever he R&R a wheel and uses a torque wrench every time to tighten the nuts. He has never had a problem with any that he has done that way and he has quite literally done thousands over his career.

    One day when I stopped in to see him, he was removing a wheel on a particular car. It was obvious none of the wheel nuts or studs had ever been lubed and several nuts were galling as he tried to remove them. A couple of them he was lucky to get backed off enough to get a little lube on the threads on both sides of the nuts, then by carefully working the nuts back and forth, he managed to work the lube into the nuts far enough that they came off. I seriously doubt if the typical car owner could have gotten the wheel off or not have snapped off the studs if they had a flat.

    Here's a site that lists the torque values for various bolts, both for dry and oiled. Notice at the bottom in the BOLT TORQUE FACTORS, cadmium and zinc plating changes the torque value as much as oil changes it.

    http://www.raskcycle.com/techtip/webdoc14.html
    Last edited by Arcane; 03-07-2011 at 10:33 AM.

  4. #24
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    I always use lube (motor oil) on wheel studs and have never had a wheel fall off or loose studs.

    That being said, I don't use oil where the lugnut contacts the wheel.

    One other thing. It is a good idea to re-torque the lugnuts after you drive the vehicle for a little while. Sometimes after the wheel seats on the hub, the torque will drop a little bit.

    Brian

    edit to add: For seating studs, flip the lugnut over and use an impact to seat it without the wheel on the spindle. Use oil on threads and on face of lugnut.
    Last edited by bborr01; 03-07-2011 at 10:42 AM.
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  5. #25
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    I suppose that the anti seize on wheel stud issue will drag on as long as the Imperial/Metric debate. Everyone will of course offer anecdotal evidence to support their viewpoint.
    This is all fine with me as I'm not here to turn the world around. Just some food for thought the next time you reach for the can of anti seize.

    For over 25 years of my 40 year professional driving career I too subscribed to the use of anti seize on wheel studs, without one single issue.
    I also drove for many of those years without a seatbelt without incident. But as one lives and learns by the observation and experience of others, he soon learns that he would be a fool if he continued on the same path that contributed to the peril of others.

    My experiences are based strictly on commercial applications since these scenarios are usually heavily regulated and open to some very expensive litigation. So take this as a suggestion to alternate methods, not as an edict that heads are going to roll at the first signs of anti seize on your wheel studs.

    Below is a quote from a Tire Industry Association newsletter aimed at the commercial tire industry, I've seen many like this. I used this one only because it was convenient.

    http://www.alatiredealers.com/newsle...ter-Sept09.pdf

    Page 6:
    TIA Offers Four Tips That Commercial Vehicle Operators Can Use To
    Help Prevent Potentially Deadly Wheel-Off Accidents

    Bowie, MD - Bowie, MD - What do a pregnant woman from Maryland, a 48 year-old man from Ontario, and a driver in Seattle have in common? They are all victims of truck wheel-offs; a truck wheel flew off on the highway and struck their vehicles. Both the Ontario man and the Seattle driver were lucky- they survived. But, the woman from Maryland was killed. The Tire Industry Association (TIA), one of the leading global authorities on commercial tires and tire service training, reminds all commercial vehicle operators that improper installation procedures can lead to very tragic results similar to these.

    Thus, TIA offers the following four tips that every commercial vehicle operator should keep in mind:
    1. Proper torque in and of itself is not a guarantee that the wheel is secure on the hub or drum - the key is
    clamping force. Tire technicians must be trained to ensure that the wheel and hub are properly cleaned
    and that the wheel and fasteners are inspected before it is installed. Even with the correct torque,
    foreign material on the mating surfaces and worn threads will still cause a wheel to become loose.


    2. Use the proper wheel fastener lubricants (30-weight oil on the stud and flange nut for hub-piloted
    wheels and dry for stud-pilot).

    3. DO NOT use anti-seize compounds on stud-piloted wheels. This use has never been approved by
    wheel, hub or fastener manufacturers.

    4. Wheel fastener torque should always be checked after the first 50 to 100 miles.

    "There are plenty of myths and outright falsehoods floating around repair shops - such as using anti-seize
    compounds as wheel lubricants - which only help to perpetuate the phenomenon of wheel-offs," said TIA
    Senior Vice President of Training Kevin Rohlwing. "It's important that tire technicians receive the proper
    training to look at all aspects of clamping force - not just proper wheel torque - in order to ensure a wheel does
    not come off and create the potential for serious injury, or even death out on the roads."
    And another article aimed at the commercial truck industry on the use of anti seize.

    http://fleetowner.com/equipment/tire...yth/index.html

    So please read these if your mind is not closed and use it to your advantage, and if you still think I'm being foolish for not using anti seize, don't forget I'm not alone.

    Edited to eliminate a double quote.
    Last edited by Willy; 03-07-2011 at 06:53 PM.

  6. #26
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    Sep 2009
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    I use a stack of washers with everything lubed up with moly grease. The stack of washers acts as a bearing and the grease really lowers the force needed.

  7. #27
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    Maybe these pictures will help spawn an idea. My Grandfather worked at Budd wheel for most of his life. Among his belongings which passed to me was this tool, which I believe was for installing and/or removing wheel studs. It is marked "Budd" and "right."

    Good luck,

    Bob






  8. #28
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    Those aren't tools, they are Budd wheel nuts. The one on the left screws on the stud and holds the inner wheel on and then the nut on the right holds the outer wheel on.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Arcane
    Those aren't tools ***
    Thanks for the ID Arcane, they've always been a bit of a mystery to me.

    Bob

  10. #30
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    Bob, the items in the photos you post are for mounting dual Budd type wheels.
    The stud, not shown, protrudes out of the hub, much like a stud on a regular car only longer.
    The long nut with inner and outer threads holds the inside wheel to the hub's face, the second wheel goes on next to be held by the short nut.
    Hope this clears things up.

    Edited to add...I'm too slow!

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