Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 19

Thread: SFM and SFM/RPM Charts (Poster Size)

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    4

    Default SFM and SFM/RPM Charts (Poster Size)

    I am looking for a place online where I can buy large format machinist charts. Particularly, a chart that tells you the recommended SFM for different materials and a conversion chart that gives you RPM based on the SFM and cutting diameter. The conversion chart is not that big of deal since its an easy calculation, but it is nice to have.

    Something like these:
    http://www.melcut.com/ti_melcut/MelcutCat_32.pdf
    http://www.tapdie.com/html/sfm_to_rp...eet_per_m.html

    We had these all over our machine shop in college, and I would like to add them to our shop at work. The only large format posters I could find where the Starrett decimal equivalent charts (with tap information).\

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Ariel, WA
    Posts
    155

    Default

    You might want to look at this program. Does a lot more than just feeds and speeds.

    Dave

    http://www.cnccookbook.com/GWCalcFeedsSpeeds.htm

  3. #3
    Dr Stan Guest

    Default

    If you have access to a plotter copy & paste the charts into Power Point, enlarge them and then print to your hearts delight.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Charlottesville, VA, USA
    Posts
    703

    Default

    Posters like that tended to be freebies given away by distributors advertising the distributor or some brand if your shop was big enough to be worth their while to visit or at a trade show.

    Take a file to your local knko's copy shop or equivalent and have it plotted large format or take a smaller printed version and have it blown up. Traver's catalogs have some tear out and cut out charts (which you can also get as PDF from the online catalog pages) and starett does too. Get them to laminate it and or print on heavy stock, posterboard, or tyvek if you want. Google will find a number of online poster printing outfits.

    11x17 enlaargements you may be able to do on a self service copier. Larger formats will likely be more expensive.

    There are utilities that will let you blow up a PDF and print it across multiple sheets of paper that can be cut and pasted into a poster.

    You might be better off with a larger number of smaller charts filling up your wallspace but depending on eyesight and minimum distance to wall, sometimes bigger can be appropriate.

    MSC has different brands of decimal equivalent posters (search "wall chart") but not speeds and feeds.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    4

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by whitis
    Posters like that tended to be freebies given away by distributors advertising the distributor or some brand if your shop was big enough to be worth their while to visit or at a trade show.
    This is what I thought. Oh well, it was worth a shot. While a single large poster would be nice because our shop is not huge, I guess we can make do with a letter size chart next to each machine...maybe I'll get fancy and laminate them!

    Thanks everyone for the input

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    citrus heights, ca
    Posts
    2,117

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jstluise
    While a single large poster would be nice because our shop is not huge, I guess we can make do with a letter size chart next to each machine...maybe I'll get fancy and laminate them!
    Fed Ex/Kinko's or what ever They are calling Themselves, or another print-copy shop can make larger than letter size reproductions.

    Steve

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Oroville, WA
    Posts
    10,922

    Default

    The html page is intended to be printed on ISO paper where the ratio of adjacent side lengths is the square root of 2. Because the page is html and not an image you can resize it easily by modifying the font size. This creates a generated size change as opposed to a projected size change, so the lines, letters, and colors remain sharp and true. Depending upon how the pdf file was created this may also be true for that file.

    And it also means you can change the length/width ratios, too, without distortion when using an image. The suggestion of a walk-in printing shop is a good one as they have good printing capability for a decent price. Not to mention a wide variety of paper weight and colors to choose from.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Bremerton Washington
    Posts
    5,006

    Default

    The carbide pedlars and tool salesmen used to pack around boxes of little cardboard slide rule calculators specially made for the production machinist and set-up man. They gave them away in stacks to machine shops and handed them out in sets at trade shows. They were specialized of course. You could enter the variables by using the slides to pull the numbers under the windows and the other windows gave you all the machining data you wanted. Dia Vs speed, DOC, feed, HP everything starting from work and cutter dia, material, condition, HSS or carbide, etc.

    Simple to use, cheap to make. They fit in your shirt pocket. Didn't need a gadget to make them work. I bet I had 20 different ones in my tool box I gave away when I retired. No-one makes them any more. Now where are they when the new apprentices and noobs who really need them come along? They have to buy antiques, I guess or download one that can't be understood into their smart phone.
    Last edited by Forrest Addy; 07-23-2011 at 03:18 AM.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Oroville, WA
    Posts
    10,922

    Default

    You're reading my mind, Forrest - I was just thinking it would be fun to draw up a circular slide to do some of this. I like the circular slide idea because it comes with a hole for hanging it on a nail. Well, and they're also pretty cool.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Minnesoa
    Posts
    704

    Default

    Hi,

    You mean like this?


    I've had mine for 20+ years. A Rep gave it to me, but I can't remember who anymore. I have seldom used it because I was told real machinists had all that stuff memorized.

    dalee

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •