Page 3 of 15 FirstFirst 1234513 ... LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 143

Thread: Fabricating an impossible to find oil tank for a motorcycle

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    1,439

    Default

    That is an immensely cool bike, I love the air scoop on the front brake backing plate!

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Richmond BC, Canuckistan
    Posts
    88

    Default

    Very nice work... Was the drawn out concept for attaching the fittings to keep with the original tank or just personal preference?

    Good method to use either way. The hammerformed ends look very nice, did you use steel or wood for the form?

    Chris

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    536

    Default

    In the first pic the number plate is initialed CR and I can't quite make out the signature but would assume it to be the famous Carroll Resweber?

  4. #24
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    N.E. Arizona
    Posts
    983

    Default Thanks once again to all for your kind words!

    Hi Everyone,

    6:10 PM, Just a few quick words 'cuz there is a big looking storm moving in right now so I have to shut the computer down soon.

    The method of attaching the fittings is standard H-D since the 30s & possibly late 20s. The friend w/the aluminum tank I measured had ripped an oil tank apart that was too far gone to save & he just saved the plugs/bosses the fittings thread into. So, I got to copy those too.

    I used steel for the forms & I'll get some shots of them also 'cuz they are not as complex as one might think. I did have dreams of making a few more of these to sell & still might. For a one-off I would have used a hardwood.

    wrench74fun: What's the JJ?

    I never worked aluminum before & had been dying to try so late last winter I made the scoop. Got kinda carried away but enjoyed it.

    That is one cool thing about doing an old race bike - there is no such thing as stock as the racers/mechanics were modifying things right from the start. Especially w/these KRTTs 'cuz the brakes proved to be WAAAAAY too small right from the beginning in 1952. Everyone was coming up w/their own ideas to cool them. This was mine - albeit about 50 years too late!







    Gotta go - it's getting noisy outside! We often lose our internet even in just wind storms, so if I don't get back soon I know I'll be near another computer on Thursday.
    Last edited by jhe.1973; 01-07-2018 at 01:41 AM.
    Best wishes to ya’ll.

    Sincerely,

    Jim

    "To invent you need a good imagination and a pile of junk" - Thomas Edison

    "I've always wanted to get a job as a procrastinator but I keep putting off going out to find one so I guess I'll never realize my life's dream. Frustrating!" - Me

  5. #25
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    N.E. Arizona
    Posts
    983

    Default Bingo!

    Quote Originally Posted by J.Ramsey
    In the first pic the number plate is initialed CR and I can't quite make out the signature but would assume it to be the famous Carroll Resweber?
    Couldn't let that one rest. Yeah, it's Carroll's signature. We both worked at H-D's racing department in 1972 & got to be good friends.

    His racing record speaks for itself, but if you watched him weld & fabricate w/o total use of one arm it would amaze anyone.

    Plus, he's a downright real person - no airs about him.
    Best wishes to ya’ll.

    Sincerely,

    Jim

    "To invent you need a good imagination and a pile of junk" - Thomas Edison

    "I've always wanted to get a job as a procrastinator but I keep putting off going out to find one so I guess I'll never realize my life's dream. Frustrating!" - Me

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    939

    Default Very Well Done

    The entire tank is very well done But the BOTTOM is outstanding.Thanks for sharing this fine project and photos with us. Edwin

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    1,439

    Default

    Thanks for the close up pics of the scoop, very nice. The screen is a nice detail.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    5

    Default

    www.jockyjournal.com
    a great motorcycle board

  9. #29
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    N.E. Arizona
    Posts
    983

    Default Hole forming tools

    Hi Everyone,

    Here are the tools I made to form the holes for the filler neck & the various fittings.

    The first one is of the punch & die for the filler. The die is just some 1 3/16 hot rolled plate I had on hand & the punch is stainless. Just had that on hand too.



    The largest diameter of the punch is the finished hole size you wish.

    The pilot or small diameter is the hole size minus the amount (x2) you wish to have stick up at a right angle.

    So, lets say that you want a finished hole sticking up to be 2.375 I.D. X .250 high. The small diameter is 2.375 minus the .250 (twice because you want .25 all the way around) which will give you 1.875 diameter.

    The large I.D. in the die is the diameter of the large end of the punch (finished hole size) plus 2x the material thickness. It has to be deep enough to allow the metal to form all way to a right angle. In the case I mentioned above of a finished hole height of .250, you have to add the gain caused by the corner radius (white arrow). IIRC, I laid this out in a CAD program to make it easier to figure this depth.

    Making the punch first allowed me to use the pilot diameter as a gauge for the die that was bored & faced all in one setup. This insured that the hole was perpendicular to the face. The pilot is a snug, but slip fit in the die (probably less than .001 clearance).

    On the die, I paid close attention to the corner radius (white arrow) for a smooth polished finish. A rough finish here could/might transfer to the sheet as it was forming.

    On the punch, the black arrow points to the corner that is just rounded a bit w/a file & polished a bit also. By the time the metal has stretched enough to reach this point, it will be pretty close to parallel with the punch O.D. If it needs any help getting past this corner, it isn’t much so the radius does not have to be large.

    The next photo shows how the hole was rolled into the die when the punch is withdrawn.



    The last 2 photos show the pressure pad (made from the same material as the die) and how it all fits together. I used a husky c-clamp on each side to clamp it all together. I also made sure the punch always slid smoothly in all 3 pieces as I drew up the clamps until they were as tight as I could get them.





    The purpose for the pressure pad is to clamp the sheet firmly to be sure that there was no gathering/buckling/puckering around the hole. Therefore, it is bored for a snug, slip fit on the punch O.D. and the hole edge is only de-burred, not rounded.

    The punch has a 5/8-11 thread so it can be pulled through w/some grade 8 threaded rod I (you guessed it) had on hand.

    The next post will show the punch & die for the fitting holes.
    Last edited by jhe.1973; 01-07-2018 at 01:47 AM.
    Best wishes to ya’ll.

    Sincerely,

    Jim

    "To invent you need a good imagination and a pile of junk" - Thomas Edison

    "I've always wanted to get a job as a procrastinator but I keep putting off going out to find one so I guess I'll never realize my life's dream. Frustrating!" - Me

  10. #30
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    N.E. Arizona
    Posts
    983

    Default Fitting hole tooling

    Because I was not limited to 1 3/16 material thickness as I was in the filler neck punch & die, I made the punch & die longer to allow more support before the metal starts forming into the die.



    All the instructions for the filler neck hole punch & die are the same as for this one except for the following:

    The top of the tank was welded in place, then the fitting holes were located and finished and the bottom was welded in last (this is why there is no heat band at the bottom of the tank in the 4th photo of my 1st post starting this thread - the bottom was not yet welded in).

    The threaded shaft is ˝-13 & the nut locks it in the punch and it was accessed w/a wrench from the open bottom of the tank.

    When using either of these setups for forming the holes, I used a Ford wheel bearing grease w/molly on the punch, in the die & on the threaded rods/nuts. This grease has worked out well for various forming projects I have done.
    Last edited by jhe.1973; 01-07-2018 at 01:48 AM.
    Best wishes to ya’ll.

    Sincerely,

    Jim

    "To invent you need a good imagination and a pile of junk" - Thomas Edison

    "I've always wanted to get a job as a procrastinator but I keep putting off going out to find one so I guess I'll never realize my life's dream. Frustrating!" - Me

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •