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Thread: First. Commissioned. Metalworking. Job.

  1. #1
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    Default First. Commissioned. Metalworking. Job.

    *\o/*

    Curiously neither the miller nor the lathe were involved.

    Here's the original spec.



    The process isn't interesting enough to be interesting, certainly not to anyone here. But I photo-documented a lot of the process here.

    Here's the last pic I took prior to delivery:


    Sadly, in my excitement I neglected to take a true "final state" picture. It looks an awful lot better than that now. I wouldn't say it's shiny, but it's a very smooth surface. My plan had been to buff it all up "somehow", but in preparation for that I hit it with a plain old orbital sander with a 40 grit disc and realized that as long as I was sufficiently careful to avoid the visible circles by even motion, that the resulting finish was really quite nice. I also ended up using the orbital freehand on the bevel itself after I'd filed out the madness from freehanding the grinder with that bizarre wood framework I put together for sliding it back and forth.

    I took your collective advice to heart and there's nothing sharp about it aside from the final point on the lower left side. The steel is 1/8" thick and the bevel is only half that.

    I delivered it to the customer at a cigar lounge I frequent, which was full of "the usual suspects" all of whom ooh'ed and aaahh'ed over it. The customer himself was gobsmackingly happy.

    It's fascinating to me that starting 24 hours after the fury of braggadocia, showing the pictures to everybody I could choke hold long enough to stand still and look at them, I'm utterly crestfallen that it's gone.

    Furiously I'm casting around looking for the next project.

    But for the rest of my life I get to say that my first commissioned metalworking job was a guillotine blade. :-)

    I wouldn't have had the confidence to undertake this without you guys. Thanks again.
    ----
    Proud machining permanoob since September 2010

  2. #2
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    Nice job MWF, I would never have thought of cutting it out on a chop saw. looks like it worked well. I wonder if a fellow could mount an abrasive blade like that in a table saw and cut out a piece like that? I also wouldn't have thought of using the orbital sander to finish it. I will tuck that one away in the vault for future use . Did the customer tell you what the depth of the bevel should be, that is about the only dimension I don't see on the print.

    There was an earlier thread that showed a part drawn on a napkin that one of the features was an o-ring groove. I hate to admit this, but I looked at that drawing for a long time and never did figure out where that groove went. So now I am trying to get this 2D brain wrapped around solid modeling.

    Great job!!

    Tim

  3. #3
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    Hey thanks o/

    All those things were "what do I have at hand that would do the job."

    Ya know I actually didn't plan, even as I was doing it, on using the orbital for a finish. But you see the scorch marks, the dye lines and the "RIP 4130" inking on it. I just figured that before whatever buffing process I'd end up employing, that I should clean up the surface a bit.

    Even with the sander, my plan was to graduate up to 440 or something. But the more I looked at it, the more I liked it. I've been kicking myself for not taking a final picture because the finish is really better than that last pic even though the only difference is that I went over it a few more times.

    As for the chop saw, well... it's the only tool I have that could perform the job. Either it was gonna work or I was gonna give the guy his money back (after taking an ill-fated whack at it with a hacksaw I imagine.) It did NOT want to do what I was demanding of it. It was a 12" combination miter saw from harbor. It's clearly designed for construction grade pine. I blew out the breakers in the house 3 times and it took hours to get those four cuts done. The underlying plywood was smoking the whole way through.

    If you'd put a gun to my head two weeks ago and demanded I give a padded time estimate, I would've said 4 hours.

    not 9.

    Of course NOW it would take me less than 2, so "it's all fine."
    ----
    Proud machining permanoob since September 2010

  4. #4
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    That drawing is "Over specified". :-) If the three sides are speced,
    than the angle should NOT be there. Alternatively one of the sides
    should be deleted if the angle is.
    Same thing as listing all the "point to point" dimensions along a piece
    and then the overall dimension.
    NOW! this is of importance when tolerances are shown for all dimensions.
    Please note the smiley at top.
    ...lew...

  5. #5
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    I knew I forgot something.

    The problem with using a table saw would be keeping the piece clamped down. It would take some strange rigging I think. Though it is worth a try. Lord knows I've got enough material left over to noodle around.
    ----
    Proud machining permanoob since September 2010

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lew Hartswick
    That drawing is "Over specified". :-) If the three sides are speced,
    than the angle should NOT be there. Alternatively one of the sides
    should be deleted if the angle is.
    Same thing as listing all the "point to point" dimensions along a piece
    and then the overall dimension.
    NOW! this is of importance when tolerances are shown for all dimensions.
    Please note the smiley at top.
    ...lew...
    Agreed. When he handed me the piece of paper he was endlessly frustrated trying to get the angle right. I had to talk him down by telling him that as long as the lengths were right. "Oh yeah yeah. no the lengths are fine." That he shouldn't worry 'cause "I'll figure out the right angle."

    UPDATE: Though it's overspecified in that regard, it is missing a couple "presumably important" details ;-)
    ----
    Proud machining permanoob since September 2010

  7. #7
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    Only "a couple"? :-)
    ...lew...

  8. #8
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    Lew, I'd rather have too much information than not enough (as long as each dimension agrees with the others ).

    I have worked from a lot worse drawings, some of them my own.

    Tim
    Last edited by tmc_31; 10-29-2011 at 11:50 AM.

  9. #9
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    If that is a guiotine blade for a cigar I would hate to meet up with the guy smoking the cigar!!!
    How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Black Forest
    If that is a guiotine blade for a cigar I would hate to meet up with the guy smoking the cigar!!!
    Well good sir, if I'm ever in Germany or you're ever in New York, we'll have to be sure and sink a pint

    I'll bring the cigars.
    ----
    Proud machining permanoob since September 2010

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