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Thread: Rivett report

  1. #1
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    Default Rivett report

    Well, after finding the right levers (there are plenty) I removed the crosslide assembly, and managed to remove the T-slot topslide from the rest of it.

    The ugly remainder seems to prove that the previous owners, despite seemingly being automotive-oriented (drag racers and chassis builders), were apparently not familiar with a substance known as "lubricating oil". The gunk left in there, and on top of other areas, is quite sticky.... after removing the topslide, my hands looked as if I had been doing vehicle suspension work.

    I hope they clean their rebuild engines better than they cleaned this.... What you see in the picture is the topslide way. (The acme nut reaches under the flat top on an arm, similar to many watchmaker lathes, so you don't see a slot for it).


  2. #2
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    Default

    Keep it coming! Pretty cool. I'm looking forward to see how you repair the bull gear.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tony Ennis
    Keep it coming! Pretty cool. I'm looking forward to see how you repair the bull gear.

    I am pretty curious how I am gonna do that too..... I guess we'll have to watch and see..........

  4. #4
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    Got the topslide off and cleaned up. Getting the rest of the slide assy apart is turning out to be a real bear..... there's a lot of crap stuck on, and most of it is sticking part "A" to part "B", "C", "D", etc.

    But one part has been removed, cleaned, oiled, and is ready for storage.

    So cleanup is officially started.

    You can see the back corner where apparently it met Mr Chuck at some point


  5. #5
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    The things you find in high quality machinery....

    On the Rivett 608, for crosslide and topslide, each feedscrew has, in the end of it, a thumbscrew. These are called "dial binder screw" in the parts list.

    Well, I wondered about them, but now my questions have been answered.

    The handles are secured by a setscrew hidden in the ball-end handle, passing through the larger ball. So the handle is fixed, without the usual nut on the end of the feedscrew, and the dial is free to turn next to the handle.

    What the Rivett folks did was to drill a hole halfway through the screw shaft, crosswise in the screw, and another hole lengthwise, which is threaded. They inserted a tiny "foot" in the cross-hole hole. The "foot" has an angled surface on the inside, and a raised area on the outside.

    The "binder screw" has a cone point on it. When you screw the thumbscrew in, the cone point forces the tiny "foot" out and "binds" the dial in whatever position you want.

    A very clever and effective device, worthy of a German or Swiss machine.


  6. #6
    Join Date
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    SE Texas
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    Quote Originally Posted by J Tiers
    The things you find in high quality machinery....

    On the Rivett 608, for crosslide and topslide, each feedscrew has, in the end of it, a thumbscrew. These are called "dial binder screw" in the parts list.

    Well, I wondered about them, but now my questions have been answered.

    The handles are secured by a setscrew hidden in the ball-end handle, passing through the larger ball. So the handle is fixed, without the usual nut on the end of the feedscrew, and the dial is free to turn next to the handle.

    What the Rivett folks did was to drill a hole halfway through the screw shaft, crosswise in the screw, and another hole lengthwise, which is threaded. They inserted a tiny "foot" in the cross-hole hole. The "foot" has an angled surface on the inside, and a raised area on the outside.

    The "binder screw" has a cone point on it. When you screw the thumbscrew in, the cone point forces the tiny "foot" out and "binds" the dial in whatever position you want.

    A very clever and effective device, worthy of a German or Swiss machine.

    That's a really neat idea. I will have to remember it. I wonder if it is covered by any current patent.
    Paul A.

    Make it fit.
    You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Alciatore
    That's a really neat idea. I will have to remember it. I wonder if it is covered by any current patent.
    Not that unusual- SB used a variant on their rotary tables:

    http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb...-table-130469/

    allan

  8. #8
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    Jul 2008
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    J. Tiers,
    Many thanks for posting those pictures. I've always wondered how that system worked. Simple and easy to do. I've got some projects that would work real well using that set up.

    Kitno455,
    Paula sure does great work. Somehow I missed that restoration of hers that you linked to. Her lathe restoration is just as good if not better.

    Pete

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Alciatore
    That's a really neat idea. I will have to remember it. I wonder if it is covered by any current patent.

    Shouldn't be..... Rivett went out of business long ago, and these are from the 1940's.... any patents from back then have been expired for most of a lifetime

  10. #10
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    Jun 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by kitno455
    Not that unusual- SB used a variant on their rotary tables:

    http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb...-table-130469/

    allan
    As did Graziano on their SAG 12 lathe dials - but their locking screw is closer to the outside rim on these large dials (as opposed to being on the centerline of the shaft).
    TexasTurnado

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