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Thread: OT- 2 Stoves, 1 chimney?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
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    Default OT- 2 Stoves, 1 chimney?

    I have a wood stove piped into a chimney that is about 11x7 rectangle flue, in the basement of the house. Can I add a stove pipe to it further up steam? We got an old wood cook stove, and wondered about cutting on the pipe into the same chimney, or a separate chimney. Is this OK or against code?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
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    Central Washington (state)
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    I've seen this twice, both in northern Alaska, where inspectors are few and far between.

    In both cases, the higher pipe was a bit smaller than the main and the join was angled upward to prevent back flow. The damper on the higher stove had to be closed for best draft when only the lower stove was used. The damper on the lower stove had to be closed for best draft when only the upper stove was used.

    I have seen where adjacent stoves fed a single stack via a Y joint fairly close to the stoves. The joint was just below the ceiling. In both cases the two stoves were back-to-back with a water heater tank between them.

    Now you know all that I know about the subject.

    Pops

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2006
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    north bay area
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    This will work, it was done thousands of times years ago.

    HOWEVER,, it will now be against code,,,, and the BIG ONE:

    The insurance company will cancel you if they find it.

  4. #4
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    Nov 2007
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    Woodinville, WA
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    "Code" on this issue varies all over the country. Call you local building dept. and ask them if it's ok, and what the critera is.

    If you are running EPA certified wood stoves, they are only certified with their recommended chimney anyhow. In Wa you can't install uncertified wood stoves anyhow, so the question is basically mute. Heck, you can't even resell an uncertified stove!
    Last edited by lakeside53; 11-13-2011 at 08:13 PM.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
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    Kendal, On
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    It's probably against code, but check with your Municipal building office, and or insurance company to be sure. Around here there have been a lot more wood, and pellet stoves being put in the last couple years due to rising fuel costs, and I'm seeing a lot of insulated stainless chimneys being put in. Brick and tile chimneys, unless built at the time of the house seem to be out of favour (probably cost a lot more). Putting in a separate chimney for the cook stove might be an option.

    Another thing to consider with the cook stove is insurance. A friend of mine just bought a house 2 years ago that had an old findley cook stove in the basement. He had a hard time finding insurance to cover it. It seems it was somewhat grandfathered in with the old couple who lived there and even though he went to the same insurance company it was very cost prohibitive. shame too, cause it was a nice stove in good shape. Heavy sucker too, as I had to help him lift it up the stairs.

    I talked with our insurance company (statefarm) at the time, cause I was thinking about putting it in our kitchen (we currently have a small woodstove in there) and was told I couldn't because it wasn't an airtight stove. I would loved to have it in there. The wife does a lot of cooking even on our small stove in the winter, and it would have been pretty usefull.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by rws
    I have a wood stove piped into a chimney that is about 11x7 rectangle flue, in the basement of the house. Can I add a stove pipe to it further up steam? We got an old wood cook stove, and wondered about cutting on the pipe into the same chimney, or a separate chimney. Is this OK or against code?
    Short answer: don't do it.

    It might work, BUT it will almost certainly violate building codes, fire codes, and the terms of your homeowner's insurance policy. You might avoid code issues if you live in Lower Slobbovia, but insurance geeks have no mercy.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2006
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    I can see it being a problem and can see why they would not want to insure,

    It's simply not safe practice and in the event of a stovepipe backfire you could be left with an open flue on the inop. stove and this could pump hot cinders directly into the home, it could also allow for excessive oxygen to supercharge the stove pipe and in the event of a pipe fire it could aid in a total meltdown...

    measure up your space - im running two segregated pipes directly up inside my chimney and it's very safe...

  8. #8
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    Feb 2008
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    About the biggest danger is carbon monoxide, which in certain wind and therefore draft conditions can be drawn through the unlit stove and in to in habited parts of the dwelling, after that it's goodnight Vienna.

    Don't do it.!

  9. #9
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    Iv seen videos on other 2 X 1 Y subjects, And they never turn out well.

  10. #10
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    May 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by Limy Sami
    About the biggest danger is carbon monoxide, which in certain wind and therefore draft conditions can be drawn through the unlit stove and in to in habited parts of the dwelling, after that it's goodnight Vienna.

    Don't do it.!

    Good point - although both being wood burners your going to be coughing your head off first as it's no where as sneaky as gas it still can happen.

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