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Thread: arbour presses

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    north bay area
    Posts
    4,195

    Default arbour presses

    I recently was fortunate enough to pick up two arbour presses at good prices, one is a "Dake" , the other a "Greenard". ( One is a 1 1/2 ton,. the other a 3 ton.

    I need to build stands for both of them as both were bolted to benches , which i do not want to do with them. Rather have a freestanding stand on the floor.

    Any ideas, ?, gotta be heavy i know, wondering what you folks have built for arbour presses?

    Thanks for any suggestions you have.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Kirkland, Washington
    Posts
    931

    Default

    3 ton Jet Arbor press. Stand made of 1-1/4 pipe , some angle iron and a piece of 1/2 inch plate for the top. A hole in the top plate so I can press long pieces or use the larger keyway broaches. The whole thing bolted to the floor with four 1/2 inch bolts.

    The press did not come with a ratchet so I made one to make the broaching a bit easier. When I first bought the press, I bolted it to the bench top. What a large pain in the cheeks. It was always in the way and when I needed it I had to remove all the crap that somehow piled itself on the press table.

    For safety bolt it to the floor so you don't become a sandwich between it and the floor.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Camillus, NY (Syracuse)
    Posts
    372

    Default

    Grizzly sell an arbor press stand. that is real solid, doesn't look like it would be to hard to make.

    http://www.grizzly.com/products/Heav...ss-Stand/H7832
    jack

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 1999
    Location
    SE OZ
    Posts
    1,966

    Default Pressing need

    I have a 3T arbor press which is mounted on castors - it needs it.

    Ideally it should be bolted to the floor - which you will soon find out if you have even a medium size keyway to cut or gear/bearing to push off/onto a shaft.

    Mine works fine without bolts if I make sure that the pressing lever is horizontal. If the pressing lever is vertical you will cause the press to move toward you and perhaps topple toward you. If you have it on a trolley, use extended bolts into dyna-bolts or similar in your floor slab. Use castor stops as well.

    It won't take long before you are eyeing-off or using your shop hydraulic hoist - but do be careful.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Winnipeg Manitoba
    Posts
    1,874

    Default

    Mine works fine without bolts if I make sure that the pressing lever is horizontal. If the pressing lever is vertical you will cause the press to move toward you and perhaps topple toward you. If you have it on a trolley, use extended bolts into dyna-bolts or similar in your floor slab. Use castor stops as well.
    Probably not helpful/applicable here but I still like the idea of "pots" in the floor to fasten down such items with chain and binders.
    Still have this vision about the perfect shop floor and a series of said pots are on the list for sure [while it can be done after the fact, its one of those deals that is way easier to do during the building process]

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    north bay area
    Posts
    4,195

    Default

    Checking my steel stock i have some 2x2x1/4 wall tubing i could weld up for the legs, but i,m thinking a 3x3 x 1/4 tube would be a minimum with a 1/2 inch plate top and lower shelf.
    I have some 3x3 round pipe but it,s much nicer to weld up square edges for a nicer visual effect.
    I had thought about some HD casters as tiffie has , so this will be moveable, but am concerned about the tippie ness of this unless it,s fully anchored somehow, and easily detatched to move.
    Going to check out my son,s steel stock rack and see what he has.
    I,m thinking the width should be at least double the footprint of the arbour base, not only for stability, but leaving a little space to set things on, same with the bottom shelf for storing "shorts".
    The Greenard is fairly heavy as it has the ratchet and counterweight along with the hand wheel on the left side.

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