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Thread: DB25 Knockout?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
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    Bloomington, IN
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    Default DB25 Knockout?

    Hey everyone ...

    I was wondering what the best way was to make cut outs for DB25 connectors. I need to put 12 DB25 and 2 DB9 cutouts in a piece of 22 gauge sheet metal.

    I'd love to have something like this: http://www.l-com.com/item.aspx?id=6946
    but at $460, it's just a little too steep for me .

    What do you think? Do I make my own punch? Cut these all by hand? Trace the cut out on the sheetmetal and do it a mill "by eyeball"? Something else entirely?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    British Columbia
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    3,752

    Default

    These are available from Digikey for example.
    Could they be used and then riveted to the panel or chassis?

    http://es.digikey.com/1/3/to-db25
    Home
    Good judgment comes from experience, and experience....well that comes from poor judgment.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Woodinville, WA
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    Default

    I recently sold my 9, 15 and 25 dies... and got a "small fortune" for them on Ebay.

    Now if I need one (rare...), cnc is the answer.

    Fastrack : dig around... last I checked either Mouser or Digikey has them for way less.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Ontario
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    Default

    I've cut more of those holes by hand than I care to count.
    If your sheet is aluminum it's not so bad.

    You don't have to make the ends angled, specially if the connectors are mounted from outside.

    I used one of those punches once and didn't like it. It's really difficult to keep it straight.
    Mike

    My Dad always said, "If you want people to do things for you on the farm, you have to buy a machine they can sit on that does most of the work."

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Ashburton, near Christchurch New Zealand
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    Default

    I have done a few of those with my router and a template.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Toronto
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    6,572

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MotorradMike
    I've cut more of those holes by hand than I care to count.
    I've also just done it by hand, drill, jewellers saw & board (you know, with the V) and files....doesn't take long. I also like hardware store brad points for sheet metal, makes a neat larger dia hole without the risk of grabbing....easy way to get the DB hole started
    .

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
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    Default

    Sounds like I should just do it by hand. Thanks guys!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Beaumont, TX
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    7,360

    Default

    I have a DB-25 punch, but most of the D style connectors I have mounted, and I have mounted more than a few, were installed in rectangular holes. You can mill a very nice hole with a 1/8" side cutting milling cutter. You can drill the holes for the mounting screws or just move the milling cutter out a bit at the center of each end to create a slot instead of a hole. Use a washer on the mounting screw. You don't have to file the round corners as most D connectors have a generous radius at the corners.

    Many commercial items have D connectors that are mounted in holes made in exactly this shape so don't feel you are not being professional.
    Paul A.

    Make it fit.
    You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    52N 122W Western Kanuckistan
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    What Paul said. I just use a 1/8 cutter to make a rectangular hole.
    Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Origin now settable to bottom left! All values positive. Click Here

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Location
    Nottingham, England
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    15,250

    Default

    Got a DRO on the mill ?
    If so then work out where your 6 co-ordinate points are, 4 corners and 2 holes then just use this to follow.

    If you use the centre point as 0,0 then all you have to do is move to the centre of the next hole and repeat.

    Can also use dial but watch the turns or felt tip a pattern on first.

    Working to co-ordinates is very fast but a lot of people seem to miss this manual CNC operation
    .

    Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.




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