Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 19

Thread: OT- Tin can prevents creosote ?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Delaware
    Posts
    767

    Default OT- Tin can prevents creosote ?

    I was told that throwing an empty " tin" food can into a wood burning stove once in a while will prevent creosote from forming in the chimney. Offhand, it makes no sense to me, but perhaps there's some truth here. Maybe it's the iron oxide that has an effect. Any comments ?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Kent Bridge, Ontario
    Posts
    201

    Default

    Burning seasoned wood will also prevent creosote.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    6,739

    Default

    I seriously doubt it. There are of course chemical concoctions for sale one can put in a woodstove to allegedly control creosote, but I have doubts about their effectiveness too. And an empty can? I see no way it would do anything.

    The best way I've found to control creosote buildup is to let the stove BURN, not smoulder away in an attempt to save wood.
    ----------
    Try to make a living, not a killing. -- Utah Phillips
    Don't believe everything you know. -- Bumper sticker
    Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects. -- Will Rogers
    There are lots of people who mistake their imagination for their memory. - Josh Billings
    Law of Logical Argument - Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    52N 122W Western Kanuckistan
    Posts
    40,433

    Default

    "Tin" cans are plain old steel, same as the stove. Just another rural legend.

    To stop buildup burn the stove hot for the first half hour every time you fire it up. Then close it down. That will burn off the creosote each time. Don't just start doing this without cleaning the chimney first though.
    Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Origin now settable to bottom left! All values positive. Click Here

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Chilliwack, B.C.
    Posts
    9,589

    Default

    I moved into a place once where there was a combination oil-burning and wood-burning stove. I figured it would be good to get the stove going and clear the pipes out, so I got a wood fire going good and hot, then threw in the recommended amount of something called Red Devil. After about an hour, nothing seemed to be happening, so I added another tablespoon of the stuff. Not long after that I could hear the pipes starting to snap and crackle. The parts of the pipe that I had not reached to dust off were smoking, and the pipes were all slowing getting red hot. The layer of smoke in the room started to build up in thickness and grow downwards towards the floor. When the level got too low, I got myself out of there.

    There was stuff shooting out the chimney, glowing red and looking like a fireworks display. All I could do was hope that the inside of the house didn't start on fire- outside I hosed the roof down in case anything burning settled on it. There was lots of glowing stuff shooting out the chimney and landing on the roof.

    Eventually it settled down, but I couldn't go in the house for awhile. That stuff sure did get the pipes cleaned out- two tablespoons of it was all I put in the fire, with only one being recommended.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    north bay area
    Posts
    4,310

    Default

    This is just my experience from burning wood for 40 years:

    Dry wood will "STILL" produce creosote, not much , but it will build up if left.

    A very hot fire every morning will help prevent "MOST" of it. Note Most.

    Do NOT ever trust your,e home to any of these instant or "Magic" chimney cleaners.


    Simply,,,,,,,, CLEAN THE CHIMNEY yourself, and then you know it,s clean!!!

    Buy a chimney brush and do it regularly, how often? Depends on the stove, chimney and the wood type you are burning.
    There are a big bunch of variables here,,,CHECK it Regularly, then you'll know when it's getting time to clean it.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    SW Michigan
    Posts
    4,016

    Default

    Built a cabin in the UP. 10miles of 2 track the 6miles of dirt rd to to the blacktop. Way back. Anyway set up the stove & long pipe because of the cathredral ceiling. Built a big fire, we're all happy until I heard a creak & look up to see the top pipe unlocking at the joint, then the whole pipe fell down. Had to carry a very hot very full very heavy stove outside. Funny now, not funny then.
    "Patriotism is supporting your country all the time, and your government when it deserves it". Mark Twain

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    52N 122W Western Kanuckistan
    Posts
    40,433

    Default

    10miles of 2 track the 6miles of dirt rd to to the blacktop. Way back.
    Around here that is a lot of people's driveway.
    Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Origin now settable to bottom left! All values positive. Click Here

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    SW Michigan
    Posts
    4,016

    Default

    I just sold the Sno-cat & 6x6 duece. The back just couldn't take the shake anymore.
    "Patriotism is supporting your country all the time, and your government when it deserves it". Mark Twain

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    South Wales
    Posts
    3,054

    Default

    i would suppose that a hot flue would be the answer as when we make coal by products at the coke ovens at work we cool the pipe aka condenser, bear in mind that a lot of by products can have nasty C forming stuff in them!
    the twin walled insulated chimney might be good, Sn [tin] does not stop chimney gunk [the whole plethora of bitumous craplike tar] nor does the average low carbon steel can, otherwise the steel chimney would be a very clean place, its all about the volotile content of the fuel, excess or deficient air supply and temperature, you could chuck a little coke [not the drink!] in to raise a bit of temp, it will eat away at your furnace bars though!
    [we used to be allowed 6 bags of coke a week from work for home heating, thats been stopped though, we still take a bit home off the floor though and they ignore us, when they sold it to us they found they were liable for accidents arrising from its use!] the coke does help with the problem a bit.
    The best timber i have ever had in the stove was an old apple orchard that was 'grubbed' out as the owner called it [diseased trees], fantastic smell
    mark

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •