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Thread: Work holding on a drill press table.

  1. #1

    Default Work holding on a drill press table.

    I recently had to drill some 1"x2"x 1/16" thick items on my drill press table. I tried several types of vises but still had difficulty getting the object oriented to the drill bit and securing the vice. I could get one or the other but not both at the same time. I have a plastic pan beneath my table to catch debris,drill bits,etc. and this makes bolting down the vises difficult. Would appreciatge your recommendations or ideas. Thanks Paul

  2. #2
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    1/16" thick, can you clamp the part to the drill press table with a C-clamp?

    Pictures would help.
    If the women don't find ya handsome, they should at least find ya handy

    http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y19...186/Rotary.gif

  3. #3
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    Hi,

    Throw away the vise. It isn't needed here.

    Get a clamp like this to hold the work down to the table like this. http://www.harborfreight.com/9-inch-...amp-36221.html (First one I could find). Then use a stop in a slot to prevent rotation while drilling.

    dalee

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by dalee100
    Hi,

    Throw away the vise. It isn't needed here.

    dalee

    Maybe..... I have an Atlas 1800 (same as Clausing) with an MT3 spindle..... it will eat that clamp for breakfast and ask for more.

    I bolted an X-Y table with 6 x 12 top (similar to Phase II) on the DP table, and use a vise clamped down on that when I want a vise, or I can clamp directly if that's better.

    Makes it REALLY easy to align the hole and drill. Downside is you HAVE to align, but if you have a 3/4" drill in the spindle, clamping of some sort is not optional, preferably clamping down solidly....

    There are also "safety vises" that have an arm thru a swivel on the table back... They hold the part to keep it from spinning, but allow you to move it around to drill holes fairly freely. OK for smaller parts and small holes that are not likely to "ride up" the drill.

    My DP had one on it, but the seller kept it.

  5. #5
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    I make a lot of use of a Jorgensen clamp on my drill presses. I pretty much always use a sacrificial piece of mdf as well, as a base. Lay the part on the base, open or close the clamp so the jaws come parallel at the diameter you're clamping. Lay the clamp flat on the base and snug up the handles, making sure to keep the jaws parallel.

    Once you do this a few times it's easy to get the hang of it. Then just hold the clamp while allowing the drill bit to center the workpiece, then hold more tightly and drill. I like to get the hole well started, then ease up on the bit and let the workpiece self-center again, then hold and drill.

    I've been meaning to get a couple more of these clamps. One I would modify by taking it apart and cutting a V groove right down the center on both jaws. This would be handy for holding a piece of flat, relatively thin material. Then you can cut some mdf as a sacrificial spacer and backup for the piece you're drilling.

    Only on rare occasions do I find the need to secure the clamp to the drill press table.

    Now there is one other thing that I've thought of, and that is to use the Jorgensen clamp hardware and one of the jaws, but make a longer version of the other jaw and reassemble it. Now you would have a real handle to hang onto.

    Since the clamp is sometimes too wide (or tall as it's laying on its side on the dp table) I have envisioned copying it in metal and making it much thinner.

    And then there is the metal handle which you might call the fixed jaw, with a movable jaw which has a pivoting jaw on it. It would automatically adjust to hold the workpiece firmly as you tighten the clamp. You could still use the two threaded adjusting rods like the normal Jorgensen, but it would be easier and faster to use since once you've set it for the diameter you're gripping, you could use just one adjusting rod to open and close it.

    Note that the theme for this idea is to be able to grip a workpiece firmly and safely while allowing for it to float for self-centering. For the most part there's no need to clamp this clamping device to the table. You still could, of course, depending on your needs. Drilling out multiple parts in a bit of a production run, for example. As an improvement to this last type of gripping device, you could drill a few holes in the handle/jaw so it could be screwed to the piece of sacrificial mdf. It more or less becomes a low-profile vice with a replaceable base.

  6. #6
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    Throw away the vise? No. Throw away that tray that is making it hard to clamp things down. You didn't say if this is a floor stand DP or a smaller bench top model, but if bench top, the bench will catch things and if floor stand, get a broom.

    I may get some heat for this, but if you are drilling smaller holes, like 1/16" or 1/8" I would clamp these small parts in a drill press style vise and hold that vise by hand. I would orient the vise screw to lean on or near the column just in case it does try to grab and spin. It won't get very far that way. If larger holes, you can drop some bolts through the vise's bolt slots and just put the nuts and some washers on loosely below the table to allow you freedom to locate the holes. The bolts will still keep it from getting too far out of control.

    If the holes are larger than, say 3/8" or 1/2", then do bolt it down tight.

    Parallels can help in positioning the part. Also, if you are drilling several holes, they are probably at one or two spacings from the sides of the part. Once you get the fixed vise jaw the right distance for one and it is bolted down tight, you can just slide the part on the parallels to the next hole(s) and re-tighten the vise.

    Anyway, that's what I would do.
    Last edited by Paul Alciatore; 01-26-2012 at 02:06 AM.
    Paul A.

    Make it fit.
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  7. #7
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    There's a trick to drilling on ocation in the drill press where getting things lined up may be uncertain. Plain raw eye power is tricky. There are some aids you can use.

    First acquire a "wiggler set" and learn to use it. That's the official way. A wiggler will help your line things of to 0.005 or the layout if your eyes are good enough. Here's a wiggler set tutorial: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RhtBdar4iVg

    If you don;t want to be fussy. Center punch the location deep enough to give you a 1/16 or 2 mm dia punch mark. Install a 1/16" or #53 or a 2mm drill and positioning the work by hand find the punch mark with the drill. The drill being long and flexible will steer itself into the punch mark, drill just to the lip and stop. repeat for all other holes. You have the holes located and ready for the size drill.

    Place the piece on the table, start the drill, enter the drills tip in the located hole when the crill centers itself it will pull a light part into alignment. Stop and clamp. Drill as needed.

    Drilling thin smalling sheet metal poses special problems. The drill has a tendancy to break through suddenly and "follow the flutes" You need to "back off the lip angle. Here's alink to a post response by a very handsome and intelligent man that discusses doctoring drills. http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/showthread.php?t=25998 look at post #2 about 3/4 of the way down.

    BTW, if need to learn a few new skills it doesn't hurt to practice them at first on scrap and remnents. That way when you need the skills you don't have to develop them on the spot, under the gun, on work you already have hours in making.
    Last edited by Forrest Addy; 01-26-2012 at 02:36 AM.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Alciatore
    I may get some heat for this, but if you are drilling smaller holes, like 1/16" or 1/8" I would clamp these small parts in a drill press style vise and hold that vise by hand.

    Anyway, that's what I would do.
    *shakes head* We normaly call that a portable drill, Except you seem to have gotten it backwards... The crooked, inaccurate holes that result are why we eventualy go out and buy drill presses.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Alciatore
    I may get some heat for this, but if you are drilling smaller holes, like 1/16" or 1/8" I would clamp these small parts in a drill press style vise and hold that vise by hand.
    Im guilty
    Feel free to put me on ignore....

  10. #10
    Rosco-P Guest

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    The vise JTiers is referring to: http://www.heinrichco.com/sdvise.htm

    A vise doesn't have to be bolted down solidly to safely drill small parts, but the right side of it shoud butt up against stud or bolt protruding from the table to help keep vise from being pulled out of you hand(s) should the drill catch.

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