Page 1 of 5 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 46

Thread: ot: tunnel digging as a hobby

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    1,463

    Default ot: tunnel digging as a hobby

    Anyone?

    It is from "Tunnel-Digging as a Hobby (Aug, 1932)" By Modern Mechanics. The other pages are about various strange homes (one is a hanging home, etc ...)
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harrison_Gray_Dyar,_Jr.

    According to Pamela M. Henson, they got Dyar in a bit of trouble: During the 1920s Dyar's most peculiar hobby came to light. When a truck fell into a labyrinth of tunnels near Dyar's old home in 1924, newspaper speculation attributed these to World War I spy nests, Civil War trysts, and mad scientists. Eventually Dyar accepted responsibility for the tunnels and similar works behind his new home, saying he found relaxation in digging underground. The brick-walled tunnels extended for hundreds of feet and measured six by six feet.


    More photos (just three) here http://thelocation.wordpress.com/201...rue-d-c-story/
    Last edited by Elninio; 03-22-2012 at 10:49 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Columbus, Ohio
    Posts
    2,349

    Default

    Im curious. Is there any more to the article?

    rock~
    Civil engineers build targets, Mechanical engineers build weapons.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Gilmer, TX
    Posts
    476

    Default

    Yeah, I can see where this is headed. First we have a couple of adventurous members here that construct their own tunnel network and then they will be back wanting advice about how to get their Bridgeport mill down to the lowest level.
    Cheers,
    Gary

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    6,572

    Default

    well its a novel solution to the lack of space we all suffer from
    .

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN
    Posts
    1,139

    Default

    Getting it down is the easy part. It's getting it back out when you move...

    There's gotta be a better method than a shovel and bucket brigade to get the dirt out. Are there small tunneling machines you could build and then use an elevator to remove the spoils?

    Also, how big of a hole can you make before fear of collapse?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Madison, WV
    Posts
    99

    Default

    Getting it down there will be easy. It will be the post on how to get grandpa's mill out after paving over the yard entrance 10 yrs later that will be entertaining.


    Jim types faster

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Gilmer, TX
    Posts
    476

    Default

    Now that you updated the information, I can see that getting the Bridgeport down will certainly not be a problem. As the truck driver found out, just get near the tunnel and everything just goes down, down, down.
    Cheers,
    Gary

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    1,463

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by gcude
    Yeah, I can see where this is headed. First we have a couple of adventurous members here that construct their own tunnel network and then they will be back wanting advice about how to get their Bridgeport mill down to the lowest level.
    I remember a while ago there was a guy on cnczone who had the head of his VMC rise up into a closet , because it was so tall.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Farmington Hills, MI
    Posts
    239

    Default

    I believe that this is a hobby that's very popular with the Mexican drug guys. Most tunnels run in a north - south direction... mostely north

    Joe B

  10. #10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mcgyver
    well its a novel solution to the lack of space we all suffer from
    Yeah, I can see that, but somehow going vertically from the mill to the lathe and then the workbench sounds like a lot more work. And what happens when you drop a screw? Now you gotta go down three floors to look for it!

    I think I still prefer a horizontal layout.
    .
    "Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work." Thomas Edison

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •