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Thread: Shaper - depth of cut

  1. #1

    Default Shaper - depth of cut

    I'm a new South Bend 7" shaper owner. In mild steel, what's the usual depth of cut and feed rate?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    North west California
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    885

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    I have a 8 inch Shape rite. It is slightly heaver built. On mild steel I have taken .150 depth of cut with a .20 feed. Used this setting to square a 6x6 block. Shapers can take a surprising cut if the tool is sharpened right and all is set properly.
    Bob

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Central Western NSW, Australia
    Posts
    296

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    I usually limit my Douglas to an 0.060" cut, but it could take more with ease. Rarely more than 0.015" side feed - I'm never in that much of a hurry.
    Tel

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 1999
    Location
    SE OZ
    Posts
    2,266

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    +1 for my 11" (Australian-made) "Douglas" shaper.

    I make a point of never hurrying or getting stressed either before I go into my shop or while I am in it.

    Same with most other things too - although it can be hard to do with some people - but I manage which stresses them and not me.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Ashburton, near Christchurch New Zealand
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    5,102

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    I find my little Adept 2 shaper will remove much more material when in a horizontal feed than a vertical feed.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Oroville, WA
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    11,071

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    Quote Originally Posted by The Artful Bodger
    I find my little Adept 2 shaper will remove much more material when in a horizontal feed than a vertical feed.
    That's interesting - do you suppose it is tool form factor?? My 16" Whipp shaper didn't seem to have any known limits of what it could cut in one pass. If it didn't outright stop (which it did often ) then it would finish the cut. My smaller Atlas shaper can't do that, but it short strokes really fast and gets the job done in about the same time because of rep rate. Another difference is my Whipp would spin off smoking blue curls but the Atlas does not.

    I once ground a cutter for my whipp that looked like a shingle splitter. I figured it would break off but the darn thing would actually cause the ram to stall and the belts to slip (the slippage capability was by design) if the cut was too deep or the ram advance too slow. I'd seen a vid on YouTube with a similar shape and had to try it on some 1018. It spits off the curls with a PING!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Kirkland, Washington
    Posts
    871

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    My old Atlas 7" shaper was only good for about .025" per cut.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by dp
    I once ground a cutter for my whipp that looked like a shingle splitter. I figured it would break off but the darn thing would actually cause the ram to stall and the belts to slip (the slippage capability was by design) if the cut was too deep or the ram advance too slow.
    Although this is only a little 7" South Bend, not a 16" shaper like the Whipp you're talking about, I've already stalled it, which concerned me because the bull gear is some sort of pressed fibre, not metal. In the case of my SB, the ram clamping handle allowed the ram to slip. I'm not sure if that's the built in safety in South Bends / crank shapers in general or not, but I'm sure glad it did slip.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Ashburton, near Christchurch New Zealand
    Posts
    5,102

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    Quote Originally Posted by dp
    That's interesting - do you suppose it is tool form factor?? My 16" Whipp shaper didn't seem to have any known limits of what it could cut in one pass. If it didn't outright stop (which it did often ) then it would finish the cut. My smaller Atlas shaper can't do that, but it short strokes really fast and gets the job done in about the same time because of rep rate. Another difference is my Whipp would spin off smoking blue curls but the Atlas does not.

    I once ground a cutter for my whipp that looked like a shingle splitter. I figured it would break off but the darn thing would actually cause the ram to stall and the belts to slip (the slippage capability was by design) if the cut was too deep or the ram advance too slow. I'd seen a vid on YouTube with a similar shape and had to try it on some 1018. It spits off the curls with a PING!

    The problem with this little shaper on vertical cuts is that too much feed, or too wide a tool, causes chatter which I presume is due to the rigidity (or lack of) of this little machine, maybe the clearance in the ram slide and the cross slides are allowing the ram to lift. On a horizonal cut the table is much stiffer and the ram slide and the horizontal slide are not being lifted.

    Thats my theory anyway.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Posts
    906

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    Razor sharp tooling really makes a difference, as well as using a rougher geometry cutter for max. removal rates. My current shaper is an Elliot 14M, 3 hp.

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