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Thread: Using up every last bit of scrap

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
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    Mouldy, Or
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    395

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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank46
    Just curious but wouldn't delrin make decent supports for a steady rest? As a replacement for the brass/bronze fingers? Thanks, Frank
    I don't think they would take the heat and friction for very long
    --
    Tom C
    ... nice weather eh?

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
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    Finland
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank46
    Just curious but wouldn't delrin make decent supports for a steady rest? As a replacement for the brass/bronze fingers? Thanks, Frank
    Friction will soon melt them down and anything not-ground will eat them up pretty soon and badly.

    But for some sensitive/delicate/light work and with a lubricant they might work.

  3. #13
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    Apr 2009
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    Ashburton, near Christchurch New Zealand
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank46
    Just curious but wouldn't delrin make decent supports for a steady rest? As a replacement for the brass/bronze fingers? Thanks, Frank
    I have a travelling steady that was supplied with my c1907 Drummond lathe which had wooden inserts instead of fingers.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Albuquerque
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    2,148

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    Quote Originally Posted by The Artful Bodger
    I have a travelling steady that was supplied with my c1907 Drummond lathe which had wooden inserts instead of fingers.
    Wooden? I hope that were either Ebony or Lignum Vitae. :-)
    ...Lew...

  5. #15
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    Apr 2009
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    Ashburton, near Christchurch New Zealand
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lew Hartswick
    Wooden? I hope that were either Ebony or Lignum Vitae. :-)
    ...Lew...

    I think it was a block of whatever was available. Presumably one was expected to mount a block in the holder (two blocks actually) and drill a hole through to match the diameter of the work. No doubt it worked quite well.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Cleveland
    Posts
    214

    Default There's no such thing as scrap...

    You just haven't found a small enough project yet.

    A few random comments here: While I like McMaster Carr for information and service their prices on many things (like plastics) is just painful. I do much better on a lot of things on ebay.

    Frank: The material is WAY to soft for the application you suggested. If the pressure didn't kill it the heat would.
    Allans Rule: Anything worth doing is going to be a pain in the butt.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    2,078

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    I use collets to get the most out of material,especially material like ivory. With a slight undercut on a stepped out collet that I have turned a specific diameter in to hold a particular project,I can grip and turn ivory using only 1/32" of material. The step I turn has a dovetail effect on grabbing the ivory.

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